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This is my first time trying to make a program that uses the Kinect and I have NO idea why I keep getting a null error. Maybe someone who knows the KinectSDK better can help?

public ProjKinect()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    updateSensor(0);//set current sensor as 0 since we just started
}

public void updateSensor(int sensorI)
{
    refreshSensors();//see if any new ones connected
    if (sensorI >= sensors.Length)//if it goes to end, then repeat
    {
        sensorI = 0;
    }
    currentSensorInt = sensorI;
    if (activeSensor != null && activeSensor.IsRunning)
    {
        activeSensor.Stop();//stop so we can cahnge
    }
    MessageBox.Show(sensors.Length + " Kinects Found");
    activeSensor = KinectSensor.KinectSensors[currentSensorInt];
    activeSensor.ColorStream.Enable(ColorImageFormat.RgbResolution640x480Fps30); //ERROR IS RIGHT HERE
    activeSensor.DepthStream.Enable();
    activeSensor.SkeletonStream.Enable();
    activeSensor.SkeletonFrameReady += runtime_SkeletonFrameReady;
    activeSensor.DepthFrameReady += runtime_DepthFrameReady;
    activeSensor.ColorFrameReady += runtime_ImageFrameReady;
    activeSensor.Start();//start the newly enabled one
}
public void refreshSensors()
{
    sensors = KinectSensor.KinectSensors.ToArray();
}

Error:

Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

BTW, it says I have 1 Kinect connected, so I know that it at least recognizes that I have things to connect to. It also doesn't work if I just say 0 instead of currentSensorInt. Also an error at the DepthStream.Enable if I comment out the ColorStream.Enable. So I am guessing I am just doing something wrong when creating the sensor?

Hopefully it's something small. Thanks in advance :)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't see anything overtly wrong, but I've also not seen the sensor acquired and setup exactly this way before. Have you had a look through the Kinect for Windows Developer Toolkit examples? There are multiple examples of how to connect to a Kinect, some are simply brute-force connections while others are pretty robust.

For example, this is a trimmed version of the connection code from the SlideshowGestures-WPF example:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Active Kinect sensor
    /// </summary>
    private KinectSensor sensor;

    /// <summary>
    /// Execute startup tasks
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sender">object sending the event</param>
    /// <param name="e">event arguments</param>
    private void WindowLoaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        // Look through all sensors and start the first connected one.
        // This requires that a Kinect is connected at the time of app startup.
        // To make your app robust against plug/unplug, 
        // it is recommended to use KinectSensorChooser provided in Microsoft.Kinect.Toolkit
        foreach (var potentialSensor in KinectSensor.KinectSensors)
        {
            if (potentialSensor.Status == KinectStatus.Connected)
            {
                this.sensor = potentialSensor;
                break;
            }
        }

        if (null != this.sensor)
        {
            // Turn on the color stream to receive color frames
            this.sensor.ColorStream.Enable(ColorImageFormat.InfraredResolution640x480Fps30);

            // Add an event handler to be called whenever there is new color frame data
            this.sensor.ColorFrameReady += this.SensorColorFrameReady;

            // Start the sensor!
            try
            {
                this.sensor.Start();
            }
            catch (IOException)
            {
                this.sensor = null;
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Execute shutdown tasks
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sender">object sending the event</param>
    /// <param name="e">event arguments</param>
    private void WindowClosing(object sender, System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e)
    {
        if (null != this.sensor)
        {
            this.sensor.Stop();
        }
    }
}

The easiest way to get a sensor though is to use the KinectSensorChooser class, which is part of the Microsoft.Kinect.Toolkit namespace. It does all the work for you. For example, here is a trimmed version of my setup:

public class MainViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    private readonly KinectSensorChooser _sensorChooser = new KinectSensorChooser();

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the MainViewModel class.
    /// </summary>
    public MainViewModel(IDataService dataService)
    {
        if (IsInDesignMode)
        {
            // do something special, only for design mode
        }
        else
        {
            _sensorChooser.Start();

            if (_sensorChooser.Kinect == null)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Unable to detect an available Kinect Sensor");
                Application.Current.Shutdown();
            }
        }
    }

That's it. I've got a sensor and I can start working with it. The larger example of how I connect and control the Kinect uses the KinectSensorManager class from the Toolkit, which is in the KinectWpfViewers namespace:

public class MainViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    private readonly KinectSensorChooser _sensorChooser = new KinectSensorChooser();

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the MainViewModel class.
    /// </summary>
    public MainViewModel(IDataService dataService)
    {
        if (IsInDesignMode)
        {
            // do something special, only for design mode
        }
        else
        {
            KinectSensorManager = new KinectSensorManager();
            KinectSensorManager.KinectSensorChanged += OnKinectSensorChanged;

            _sensorChooser.Start();

            if (_sensorChooser.Kinect == null)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Unable to detect an available Kinect Sensor");
                Application.Current.Shutdown();
            }

            // Bind the KinectSensor from the sensorChooser to the KinectSensor on the KinectSensorManager
            var kinectSensorBinding = new Binding("Kinect") { Source = _sensorChooser };
            BindingOperations.SetBinding(this.KinectSensorManager, KinectSensorManager.KinectSensorProperty, kinectSensorBinding);
        }
    }

    #region Kinect Discovery & Setup

    private void OnKinectSensorChanged(object sender, KinectSensorManagerEventArgs<KinectSensor> args)
    {
        if (null != args.OldValue)
            UninitializeKinectServices(args.OldValue);

        if (null != args.NewValue)
            InitializeKinectServices(KinectSensorManager, args.NewValue);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initialize Kinect based services.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="kinectSensorManager"></param>
    /// <param name="sensor"></param>
    private void InitializeKinectServices(KinectSensorManager kinectSensorManager, KinectSensor sensor)
    {
        // configure the color stream
        kinectSensorManager.ColorFormat = ColorImageFormat.RgbResolution640x480Fps30;
        kinectSensorManager.ColorStreamEnabled = true;

        // configure the depth stream
        kinectSensorManager.DepthStreamEnabled = true;

        kinectSensorManager.TransformSmoothParameters =
            new TransformSmoothParameters
            {
                // as the smoothing value is increased responsiveness to the raw data
                // decreases; therefore, increased smoothing leads to increased latency.
                Smoothing = 0.5f,
                // higher value corrects toward the raw data more quickly,
                // a lower value corrects more slowly and appears smoother.
                Correction = 0.5f,
                // number of frames to predict into the future.
                Prediction = 0.5f,
                // determines how aggressively to remove jitter from the raw data.
                JitterRadius = 0.05f,
                // maximum radius (in meters) that filtered positions can deviate from raw data.
                MaxDeviationRadius = 0.04f
            };

        // configure the skeleton stream
        sensor.SkeletonFrameReady += OnSkeletonFrameReady;
        kinectSensorManager.SkeletonStreamEnabled = true;

        // initialize the gesture recognizer
        _gestureController = new GestureController();
        _gestureController.GestureRecognized += OnGestureRecognized;

        kinectSensorManager.KinectSensorEnabled = true;

        if (!kinectSensorManager.KinectSensorAppConflict)
        {
            // set up addition Kinect based services here
            // (e.g., SpeechRecognizer)
        }

        kinectSensorManager.ElevationAngle = Settings.Default.KinectAngle;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Uninitialize all Kinect services that were initialized in InitializeKinectServices.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sensor"></param>
    private void UninitializeKinectServices(KinectSensor sensor)
    {
        sensor.SkeletonFrameReady -= this.OnSkeletonFrameReady;
    }

    #endregion Kinect Discovery & Setup

    #region Properties

    public KinectSensorManager KinectSensorManager { get; private set; }

    #endregion Properties
}

The advantage of all this extra code can be seen in the KinectExplorer example in the Toolkit. In short - I can manage multiple Kinects with this code, unplugging one and the program just switches to a different one.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. But somehow it just started working after unplugging and plugging the kinect back in a lot of times. Guessing it was just a weird glitch because it works now. Thanks for all the sample code. Definitely helping me grasp the SDK. –  Brandon Dec 13 '12 at 20:59
1  
Yes, that happens. I've not figured out why. You will sometimes get an "InvalidOperation" exception in Kinect.dll -- which is normally resolved when you unplug the Kinect and plug it back in. Keep your Output window open when debugging to make sure you can watch for this exception to know when you need to unplug stuff. :) –  Evil Closet Monkey Dec 13 '12 at 21:03

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