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What is the best algorithm/approach to iterate through a file with numerous lines of Countries and printing out the country with the most occurrences?

Each line is a string and only contains a country name on each line.

Assume there could be 1 billion distinct countries. (Countries is a bad example)

United States
Iran
India
United States
China
Iran
....
....
Canada //1 billionth line
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Well if there are 1 billion DISTINCT countries, then the output of the most frequently occurring country will be ALL of those 1 billion distinct countries. :) Just saying... –  Amey Dec 13 '12 at 4:49
    
Hence, the "there could" –  KingKongFrog Dec 13 '12 at 4:52
    
Just saying if all the entries (countries) are DISTINCT there is no need to write any code. All would occur only once. –  Amey Dec 13 '12 at 4:53
    
Yes, but you would have to somehow check if that was the case. –  KingKongFrog Dec 13 '12 at 4:57
    
what OS? if there are truly billions of distinct values, I would just sort foo.dat|uniq -c|perl -walne'END{print $big_val} ($big_cnt,$big_val) = @F if ! $big_cnt || $big_cnt < $F[0]' –  ysth Dec 13 '12 at 5:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
# Count the unique elements.
my %hash;
while(<>) {
    chomp;
    $hash{$_}++;
}

# Find the key with the largest value.
sub largest_value {
    my $hash = shift;

    my ($big_key, $big_val) = each %$hash;

    while (my ($key, $val) = each %$hash) {
        if ($val > $big_val) {
            $big_key = $key;
            $big_val = $val;
        }
    }

    return $big_key;
}

print largest_value(\%hash);
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Reduced memory usage to 1/2 or less of the original. –  ikegami Dec 13 '12 at 5:04

You can just use a hash of integers. Although there are many lines, country names are limited in number so file size does not really matter:

use strict;
use warnings;
my %hash;
while(<>) {
  chomp;
  $hash{$_}++;
}

my @sorted = sort { $hash{$b} <=> $hash{$b} } keys %hash;
print "$sorted[0]: $hash{$sorted[0]}\n";
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+1 was what I was going to suggest. You didn't answer the part about printing the country with the highest count, but that's kinda trivial. –  paddy Dec 13 '12 at 4:31
    
I think printing the country with the highest is the most interesting part. Do you think, sorting is the most optimized solution, especially with billion records?? –  KingKongFrog Dec 13 '12 at 4:32
2  
Why not? There are fewer than 200 countries, and your hash will only contain no more than 200 counties. Sorting is trivial. However, Perl sorting is about O(Log O), so it might be quicker by a few miliseconds to simply search for the largest one in size. –  David W. Dec 13 '12 at 4:34
    
If you just need the most frequent, finding the max is better. But the number of countries is limited so I don't think it makes a huge difference. –  perreal Dec 13 '12 at 4:34
    
I should have used something other than countries. Probably cities in the world would have been more accurate. –  KingKongFrog Dec 13 '12 at 4:35
my $big_count = 0;
my @big_keys;

my %counts;
while (<>) {
    chomp;
    my $count = ++$counts{$_};

    if ($counts == $big_count) {
       push @big_keys, $_;
    }
    elsif ($count > $big_count) {
       $big_count = $count;
       @big_keys = $_;
    }
}

print(join(', ', @big_keys), "\n");
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Create a hash table: key is the country name, value is the number of occurrences.

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Yes, then what is the best approach once you've created the hash? –  KingKongFrog Dec 13 '12 at 4:29
    
Depend on what you want to do: You could keep "maxCountry" and "maxNum" as variables, and update as you go, or you could go through your hash at the end - remember you may have multiple countries with the same number, so scalar variable to hold the max country won't cut it... –  John3136 Dec 13 '12 at 4:31

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