Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider:

class Mobile {
  double memory_util;
  public:
  virtual void power_save(double duration) = 0;
};

class Laptop : public Mobile {
  bool is_unlocked;
  protected:
  bool is_charged;
  public:
  void power_save(double duration);
  virtual double remaining_time();
};

class NegativeNumber {}; 
class IPad : public Laptop {
  int generation;
  public:
  void power_save(double duration);
  bool isJailBroken();
};

class HPLaptop : public Laptop {
  int warranty_years; 
  public:
  void extend_warranty(int years);
};

class HPdv6 : public HPLaptop {
  bool repaired;
  public:
  double remaining_time(){  return HPLaptop::remaining_time();  }
  bool is_repaired { return repaired; }
};

And you wanted to do the following:

int main () {
  Mobile* d = new HPdv6();
  Laptop *s = d;
  d->power_save(100);
  cout << “remaining operation time: ” <<
  s->remaining_time() << endl;
  return 0;
}

Which methods would actually be called here? I understand that Mobile is a virtual function, but I'm unsure how to deal with the class hierarchy when you have pointers like this. Are there any tips about class hierarchy that will make problems that deal with various inherited classes easier to understand?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Laptop *s = d; shouldn't compile, as you need some sort of downcast. –  chris Dec 13 '12 at 5:06
    
Please explain. –  Bob John Dec 13 '12 at 5:09
    
Also, assuming that it does compile... –  Bob John Dec 13 '12 at 5:10
    
You need to cast it via static_cast or dynamic_cast because it needs an explicit cast to go down the inheritance chain. Here's the error I'm talking about: stacked-crooked.com/view?id=d3a1106b6b8f6728c9fb75a5adb81b63 –  chris Dec 13 '12 at 5:10

1 Answer 1

Once you sorted out the error in Laptop *s = d; (see static_cast<>()), you would find that HPdv6's remaining_time() would be called and Laptop's power_save() would be called.

To over-simplify, the functions are resolved by starting at HPdv6 and walking up the inheritance tree until the method is found. IPad won't be used because it doesn't appear between HPdv6 and Laptop, it sits in a separate branch.

If you want the non-oversimplified version, look up vtables. Here is the Wikipedia article on them: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_method_table

share|improve this answer
    
If it goes up the inheritance tree, why doesn't d->power_save(100) call Ipad's power_save? And s->remaining_time() should call Hpdv6's remaining_time(), right? –  Bob John Dec 13 '12 at 5:33
    
Why is laptop's power_save() called and not Ipad's power_save()? –  Bob John Dec 13 '12 at 5:42
    
Sorry, I edited that first sentence for grammar. If you picture your classes as a tree, IPad is in the tree, but it isn't in the chain between Laptop and HPdv6. –  Joshua D. Boyd Dec 13 '12 at 6:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.