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In a nutshell, i want a right div float to extend vertically 100% but it only works when i don't include <doctype> on my html

in today's standard, do i really have to add <doctype>?

This is the result in Internet Explorer:

doctype issues

this is just simple html

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
html, body {
padding:0;
margin:0;
height:100%;
}
#wrap {
background:red;
height:100%;
overflow:hidden;
}
#left {
background:yellow;
float:left;
width:70%;
min-height:100%;
}
#right {
background:pink;
float:right;
width:30%;
min-height:100%;
}
</style>

<body>
<div id="wrap">
<div id="left"> Content </div>
<div id="right"> Side Content </div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
2  
Of course you do. –  BoltClock Dec 13 '12 at 5:27
1  
Yes, it will. Your impression that it "messes up your CSS" is not in line with the standards, which is the real problem at hand. –  BoltClock Dec 13 '12 at 5:30
1  
please post a demo on jsfiddle.net. from what you've posted so far, we can't tell what the error is. –  Jeff Dec 13 '12 at 5:31
1  
@Jeff: I don't think you can force quirks mode in jsFiddle. –  BoltClock Dec 13 '12 at 5:31
1  
@Jeff: This is an IE issue - see the link in my comment on Tim's answer. –  BoltClock Dec 13 '12 at 5:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

in today's standard, do i really have to add <doctype>?

You don't have to do anything, but the absence of the DOCTYPE is essentially asserting that you conform (in the loosest sense of the term) to an unknown/inconsistent "quirks" standard.

I imagine the solution is as simple as setting the height of the parent container to 100% or to a specific pixel height.

  • ensure that height is set on the HTML and BODY elements.
  • ensure that height is set on any parent containers.

Working example: http://jsfiddle.net/7xxFj/

<div id="one">
    First column
</div>
<div id="two">
    second column
</div>​

HTML, BODY { height: 100%; }
#one { height: 100%; width: 30%; float: left; background-color: red; }
#two { height: 100%; width: 70%; float: left; background-color: blue; }

As @BoltClock pointed out in the comments, you probably want a layout that can extend beyond 100%. This requires a little more effort (but still works well within the standard).

This article shows several methods for accomplishing layouts with equal column heights. More methods here.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep. You'll want to set only a min-height: 100% on the BODY element so it stretches when content overflows down the viewport, of course. See this answer where I address basically the same issue (and explain just what exactly is going on). –  BoltClock Dec 13 '12 at 5:34
    
Ha...now I'm having trouble getting it to work: jsfiddle.net/7xxFj/3. Am I missing something obvious? –  Tim Medora Dec 13 '12 at 5:45
    
Oh, that. Getting the columns to be equal height is a different issue altogether I'm afraid... –  BoltClock Dec 13 '12 at 5:47
    
Okay, I'll post links/solution for an equal height layout; just checking that I wasn't doing something stupid. –  Tim Medora Dec 13 '12 at 5:52
    
thanks for answering my question; im also dealing with the issue having equal column height; –  user1735120 Dec 13 '12 at 6:42

Use this Code

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
<style type="text/css">
html, body {
padding:0;
margin:0;
height:100%;
}
#wrap {
background:red;
height:100%;
overflow:hidden;
}
#right {
background:blue;
float:left;
width:30%;
height:100%;
}
#left {
background:yellow;
float:left;
width:70%;
height:100%;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="wrap">
<div id="left"> Content </div>
<div id="right"> Side Content </div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

If you are thinking of considering IE (any version for that matter, lets not digress to this topic), then you are better of specifying the DOCTYPE. I have seen many pages which do not do this properly through IE into the famous Quirks mode.

share|improve this answer

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