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I have a txt file with these IP addresses and would like to sort them removing duplicate IP addresses, but retain the /subnets.

4.4.4.4/32
4.2.2.2/32
4.4.4.4/32
4.2.2.2/32
4.2.2.2/28
4.4.4.4/24
2.2.2.2/32

Eg: After sorting and removing duplicates, the above becomes

4.4.4.4/32
4.2.2.2/32
4.2.2.2/28
4.4.4.4/24
2.2.2.2/32

Any tips using awk or perl or python? I would also like to sort in ascending order.

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1  
Why is a simple sort -u inadequate? –  Kevin Dec 13 '12 at 5:30
    
Thanks. sort -u is fine, but i was looking for a python/perl script. Should have worded my question clearly.. –  rtinflux Dec 13 '12 at 5:37
    
What is your expected output? Did you mean eliminating duplicating IP, regardless of the /32, /28, ...? –  Hai Vu Dec 13 '12 at 5:39
2  
Re the updated question: As you were told, all you need is a basic lexical sort. What problem are you having? Please show us your work. –  ikegami Dec 13 '12 at 6:02
1  
The posted desired output is not sorted by any obvious criteria. What is your sorting criteria? –  Ed Morton Dec 13 '12 at 11:12

4 Answers 4

Since the data appear to be extremely regular it's fairly easy to ensure correct sorting in Python by use of the key argument. This is used to create a "sort key" for each instance in the list to be sorted. People often use a lambda as a sort key function, but for completeness here we'll define something useful.

The duplicate removal is better done before the sort in Python. Since the list has to be sorted anyway, it doesn't matter that converting it into a set will result in an arbitrary ordering of the unique strings, the easy way to "uniquieify" list l if ordering doesn't matter in Python is

l = list(set(l))

Your test data is badly chosen, by the way, since it will sort correctly (just by accident) on a lexical sort. So you would be much better off including some examples with two- and three-digit components in the addresses so this isn't true any more. I demonstrate the non-working sort by way of explanation.

In [42]: data = """\
4.4.4.4/32
4.2.2.2/32
4.4.4.4/32
4.2.2.2/32
4.2.2.2/28
4.4.4.4/24
2.2.2.2/32
12.13.14.15/24
11.12.13.14/24""".splitlines()

In [43]: data.sort()

In [44]: data
Out[44]: 
['11.12.13.14/24',
 '12.13.14.15/24',
 '2.2.2.2/32',
 '4.2.2.2/28',
 '4.2.2.2/32',
 '4.2.2.2/32',
 '4.4.4.4/24',
 '4.4.4.4/32',
 '4.4.4.4/32']

In [45]: data = list(set(data))

In [46]: data.sort()

In [47]: data
Out[47]: 
['11.12.13.14/24',
 '12.13.14.15/24',
 '2.2.2.2/32',
 '4.2.2.2/28',
 '4.2.2.2/32',
 '4.4.4.4/24',
 '4.4.4.4/32']

In [48]: def sortkey(addr):
   ....:     add, pref = addr.split("/")
   ....:     a, b, c, d = (int(x) for x in add.split("."))
   ....:     return a, b, c, d, int(pref)
   ....: 

In [49]: data.sort(key=sortkey)

In [50]: data
Out[50]: 
['2.2.2.2/32',
 '4.2.2.2/28',
 '4.2.2.2/32',
 '4.4.4.4/24',
 '4.4.4.4/32',
 '11.12.13.14/24',
 '12.13.14.15/24']

It doesn't matter too much that the sort key function is in Python, since it is applied only once to each list value as a part of a "decorate/sort/undecorate" algorithm. More generally, for this problem domain you might find the ipaddress module helpful: http://docs.python.org/dev/howto/ipaddress.html

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You should be able to do this just using sort -ur.

Edit: To do this in python, you can do the following:

with open('ipaddress.txt', 'r') as f:
    address = sorted(list(set(line for line in f)), reverse=True)
    for ad in address:
        print(ad)
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+1 for command line solution, as in 'sort -ur ipaddress.txt >ipaddress_uniq.txt' –  Mauritz Hansen Dec 13 '12 at 7:56

in python you can do:

In [3]: l = []

In [4]: with open('ipaddress.txt', 'r') as input_file:
   ...:     for elem in input_file.readlines():
   ...:         if elem.strip() not in l:
   ...:             l.append(elem.strip())
   ...:

In [5]: l
Out[5]: ['4.4.4.4/32', '4.2.2.2/32', '4.2.2.2/28', '4.4.4.4/24', '2.2.2.2/32']
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Thanks Avasal.. –  rtinflux Dec 13 '12 at 5:38
    
@rtinflux: please accept the answer which helped you, will will help you in future meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… –  avasal Dec 18 '12 at 11:07

You can get unique lines in the order they appear in the file using awk:

awk '!seen[$0]++'

If you want the whole pipeline:

awk '/#/{sub(/#.*/,"",$0)} length($0) && !seen[$0]++' ipnum.txt

untested

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