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I've encountered a behavior in a Python program that I've been able to condense into a smaller program. I'm pretty sure I've encountered it and solved it and the past, but can't remember how.

Consider the following Python program:

import random

class B:
    def __init__(self):
        self.attr=random.randrange(0,10)

class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.b=B()

list=[]
print "First pass"
for i in range(0,10):
    a=A()
    print "Random number in b: ",a.b.attr
    list.insert(0,a)

print "Second pass"
for l in list:
    print "Random number in b: ",a.b.attr

It typically outputs something such as:

First pass
Random number in b:  9
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  1
Random number in b:  5
Random number in b:  9
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  0
Random number in b:  6
Random number in b:  2
Random number in b:  7

Second pass
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  7
Random number in b:  7

How do we solve this? I know it has to do with how Python copies object etc., but having:

import copy
list.insert(0,copy.deepcopy(a))

Doesn't solve it as one could expect.

share|improve this question
    
Uh, in your second pass, you are displaying a.b.attr instead of l.b.attr. a is left over from the first pass loop, so you are seeing the constant output. –  MJZ Dec 13 '12 at 6:13

1 Answer 1

Maybe instead of

print "Second pass"
for l in list:
    print "Random number in b: ",a.b.attr

Use

print "Second pass"
for l in list:
    print "Random number in b: ", l.b.attr
share|improve this answer
    
I am an idiot. This solves my question, although I still have a similar issue; now to write a proper test program that reproduces the bug I'm experiencing. –  bitgarden Dec 13 '12 at 6:13
    
Here's a basic test program that expresses the gist of the problem I was having: pastebin.com/MQMKpNhh - I've figured it though (for those stumbling on this: it's because values is initiated with an empty dict, which is mutable; you want your construction vars to be initiated with immutable values) –  bitgarden Dec 13 '12 at 7:57
    
Glad you figured it out! Actually not "because values is initiated with an empty dict", but because you made values a class attribute, instead of creating it per instance inside __init__ –  warvariuc Dec 13 '12 at 8:03

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