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I have a custom shape class, simplified for the question here, and looks like the following:

class Shape : public SpriteProperties{

};

where class SpriteProperties is:

class SpriteProperties{
Point rotationPivotPoint;
Point rotationPivtoAxes;
float width, height, xPos, yPos, zPos;
Point color;
};

In the user's code, when the user initializes the shape, he uses a function of the following prototype. The params in the function are the required properties for any shape to be represented.

void init(float _x, float _y, float _w, float _h, Point* _color)
{
    //Initialize the shape
}

However, my shapes also have additional properties such as rotation pivot points and axes, that the user should specify during this initialization process somehow, and these rotation properties might/might not come to use at a later point for the user depending on how he used the class.

void prepareRotationParams(Point* _rotationPivot, Point* _rotationAxes)
{
    //
}

My question: I am thinking of restricting the user to use this prepare rotation function which might be utilized at a later point in the code, and at the same time I do not want to give the prepare rotation params in the init function itself, since these do not fall in line with the core properties that must be explicitly specified by the user for any shape. What would be the ideal approach?

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I would make init virtual and add these params(_rotationPivot and _rotationAxes) for those that can use it. –  Karthik T Dec 13 '12 at 6:33
    
Overload the init function? –  Pubby Dec 13 '12 at 6:37
    
Is there a reason why you cannot perform all initialization in the constructor? Having an init() method to set things up seems like a weak design. –  juanchopanza Dec 13 '12 at 7:09
    
@juanchopanza: The thing is the user during the init initialization might or might not have the values for the roation parameters. In addition, I have to give the capability to the user to initialize these rotation parameters through a separate function prepareRotation after init function. If the user leaves the _rotationPivot and _rotation Axes pointer uninitialized in init as default and does not use the prepareRotation function later as well, this will lead to crahes later int he program. Any suggestions? –  user1240679 Dec 13 '12 at 8:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use default arguments:

void init(float _x, float _y, float _w, float _h, Point* _color, Point* rPivot=0, Point *rAxes=0)
{
    //Initialize the shape
    if (rPivot && rAxes) {
        prepareRotationParams(rPivot, rAxes);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@juanchopanza: The thing is the user during the init initialization might or might not have the values for the roation parameters. In addition, I have to give the capability to the user to initialize these rotation parameters through a separate function prepareRotation after init function. If the user leaves the _rotationPivot and _rotation Axes pointer uninitialized in init as default and does not use the prepareRotation function later as well, this will lead to crahes later int he program. Any suggestions? –  user1240679 Dec 13 '12 at 8:17
    
@user1240679: never have unitialized pointers in your class, set them to NULL in your constructor. Then what you have to do is when the user requests a functionality that requires the rPivot and rAxes, throw an exception or print a warning if it wasn't initialized –  coyotte508 Dec 13 '12 at 8:34

First, consider to pass in arguments in the constructor. Of course this sometimes is not possible.

Second, are the rotation parameters constant once set, or can they be set multiple times? If they only can be set once and setting them twice is not supported, reconsider your design, because you essentially have 3 initialization functions (constructor, init, prepareRotationParams), which makes it easy for the user to accidentally use a partially initialized object.

Instead of having 3 initialization functions, consider the builder pattern. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Builder_pattern

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