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I'm using Rx in conjunction with a third-party API that uses the EventPattern. In this API you register your event handlers on the object and then invoke a method, StartWatching(), on the object that starts the events to begin triggering. I am using Observable.FromEventPattern to bridge the API in the Rx world but I am running into very odd problems where subscriptions will only work if they are called right by the invocation of StartWatching(). Below is a reduced case of what I am seeing.

This works:

foreach (var iq in interactionQueues)
        {
            Observable.FromEventPattern(iq, "TheEvent")
                .Subscribe(e => Log.Info("I got called!"), 
                       e => Log.Info("Error!", e),
                       () => Console.WriteLine("Seq completed!"));

            iq.StartWatching();
        }

If I call the Subscribe() and StartWatching() in different loops it stops working:

foreach (var iq in interactionQueues)
            Observable.FromEventPattern(iq, "TheEvent")
                .Subscribe(e => Log.Info("I got called!"), 
                       e => Log.Info("Error!", e),
                       () => Console.WriteLine("Seq completed!"));
foreach (var iq in interactionQueues)
           iq.StartWatching();

My only thought as to why this may happen is that the Observing or Subscribing is happening on the wrong thread. I have tried using Scheduler.CurrentThread and Scheduler.Immediate with SubscribeOn and ObserveOn but that didn't help. Any other ideas? Should I try a different Scheduler or is that a red herring?

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1  
Maybe interactionQueues.Next() generates new object on every call? If that's the case you call StartWatching on the wrong object. –  Lazin Dec 13 '12 at 7:35
    
Doh, you are right @Lazin! Calling ToArray() on my collection to force realization fixed the problems. That makes a lot more sense that odd subscription problems. :) Yay, Occam's Razor. :) If you want to make your comment an answer I'll accept it. –  user11994 Dec 13 '12 at 15:30
    
Whatever the case, separation of the subscription(Observable.Subscribe) and subscription initialization(StartWatching) is not a good idea. You need to create single cold observable, that will call internally StartWatching and ref-count subscribers. I think Paul's solution will solve this problem nicely. –  Lazin Dec 14 '12 at 6:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's wrap this in a more friendly method:

public static TheEventArgs WatchEvent(this InteractionQueue this)
{
    var ret = Observable.Create<TheEventArgs>(subj => {
        // This entire block gets called every time someone calls Subscribe
        var disp = new CompositeDisposable();

        // Subscribe to the event
        disp.Add(Observable.FromEventPattern(iq, "TheEvent").Subscribe(subj));

        // Stop watching when we're done
        disp.Add(Disposable.Create(() => iq.StopWatching());

        iq.StartWatching();

        // This is what to Dispose on Unsubscribe
        return disp;
    });

    // When > 1 person Subscribes, only call the block above (i.e. StartWatching) once
    return ret.Multicast(new Subject<TheEventArgs>()).RefCount();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, I was planning on wrapping up the resource management better and this looks like a great solution. Thanks! The only thing I don't understand is the use of Multicast(...) instead of just Publish().RefCount(). Will Publish() not do the same thing? Or is it that you just want to avoid having to call Connect()? –  user11994 Dec 13 '12 at 23:21
    
You're totally right, Publish().RefCount() is the same, I'm just used to always using Multicast –  Paul Betts Dec 14 '12 at 9:07

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