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I don't get how the value is returned by a child process and to whom?

Output is 6, 7 ; question source: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~mwalfish/classes/s11-cs372h/hw/sol1.html

Program 1: 
main() 
{ 
    val = 5; 
    if(fork()) 
    wait(&val); 
    val++; 
    printf("%d\n", val); 
    return val; 
}
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Have you tried to run it? –  Zeta Dec 13 '12 at 7:15
    
@Zeta Running didn't explain the meaning of "wait(&val);" I tried :) –  Mayank Dixit Dec 13 '12 at 7:20

3 Answers 3

Main process:

val = 5; 
wait(&val); // wait until child finishes

Child process:

val++; // val becomes 6
printf("%d\n", val); // prints 6
return val; // return val back to main process

Main process:

wait(&val); // val becomes 6
val++; // val becomes 7
printf("%d\n", val); // prints 7
return val; 
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Yah @VaughnCato the implementation is exactly like this. But i dont get the "wait(&val); // wait until child finishes" line. how this line means 'wait until child finishes' and also what happens to 'return val;' line when it is executed by child process. –  Mayank Dixit Dec 13 '12 at 7:24
    
@MayankDixit: The man page for wait() says "The wait() system call suspends execution of the calling process until one of its children terminates." –  Vaughn Cato Dec 13 '12 at 7:27
    
@MayankDixit: The function works by asking the kernel to wait for the child process. Are you wanting to know how it works internally to the kernel? –  Vaughn Cato Dec 13 '12 at 7:29
    
look: wait(time_in_milisec.) means wait for given time, how come this understands wait for child to finish :( wait(&val) in my view should wait 30789 milisec. if &val=30789 .this is how I am looking the code. –  Mayank Dixit Dec 13 '12 at 7:36
    
@MayankDixit: This is the wait function that the code is using: pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/7908799/xsh/wait.html. I'm not sure which wait you are talking about. –  Vaughn Cato Dec 13 '12 at 7:38
if(fork()) 

Creates a child process. Each process gets a copy of the var. fork returns a non-zero value in parent process. so the if gets executed only for the parent process. and wait is only called for parent process. It waits for child process to complete execution.

Child process increments val prints it and returns. Once it returns parent process resumes and executes further by incrementing var, printing its value and then returning from it from the main().

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what makes the parent to wait for child process is "wait(&val)". how this line does it? that's mah question. –  Mayank Dixit Dec 13 '12 at 7:27

A fork() basically creates a new process. This means that all current values are going to be copied. This also concludes that val in your parent process isn't the val in your child process. This is the reason you'll have to communicate somehow with the child process, which you do by using wait.

      Parent Process       |       Child process
---------------------------|---------------------------
main()                     |
{                          | #########################
    int val = 5;           | // int val = parent.val;
**  int tmp = fork();      | ** int tmp = 0;
    if(tmp) // true        |    if(tmp) // false
        wait(&val);        |        // doesn't use wait
        // waits until     |    val++; // val = 6
        // child process   |    printf("%d\n", val); 
        // returns.        |    return val; // return 6
        // saves return    | ###########|############
        // value in val <---------------+
    val++; // val = 7      | #########################
    printf("%d\n", val);   | #########################
    return val;            | #########################
}

Whenever a process exits in Linux, the return value is stored temporary. As long as the parent process doesn't get this stored value the child process is still listed as zombie. This value can be acquired with wait. So whenever you use return <value> at the end of your application wait() in your caller will give you this return value.

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agin @zeta I really don't get how "return 6;" in child returns a value to variable val :( –  Mayank Dixit Dec 13 '12 at 7:41
    
Function returns a value to calling function; if it is caught somewhere by calling function then it is ok.. or else it goes in vain; I get this. But in this code: don't know where value is returned and where it has been caught ? –  Mayank Dixit Dec 13 '12 at 7:43
    
@MayankDixit: Added an explanation. Think of it like this: there is a giant tree in the operating system which contains the hierarchy of parent and their child processes. Whenever a child process exits, it will fill its leaf with its return value, which can then be acquired by the parent process. –  Zeta Dec 13 '12 at 7:47
    
as in "int newVal= giveVal();" now return value is acquired by 'newVal' varaible. then in given case where the value is acquired, you guess? –  Mayank Dixit Dec 13 '12 at 7:56

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