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I have a file that is in the following format:

Preamble

---------------------
Section 1
...
---------------------

---------------------
Section 2
...
---------------------

---------------------
Section 3
...
---------------------

Afterwords

And I want to extract each section by the separator so that I'll have a result in:

file0:

Section 1
...

file1:

Section 2
...

file2:

Section 3
...

...

Is there a simple way to do this? Thanks.

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3  
What problem are you having? –  ikegami Dec 13 '12 at 9:11
    
@ikegami: I just can't figure out a simple solution to this. Setting states sounds overkill to me. –  Ryan Li Dec 13 '12 at 9:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

[Update] Using chomp and $_ makes this even shorter.

This should do it:

If your input record separator is a sequence of 21 -'s, this is easy with perl -ne:

perl -ne 'BEGIN{ $/=("-"x21)."\n"; $i=0; } 
  do { open F, ">file".($i++); 
       chomp;
       print F; 
       close F; 
  } if /^Section/' yourfile.txt

should work, and create files file0.. fileN.

Explanation

Easier to explain as a stand-alone Perl-script perhaps?

$/=("-"x21)."\n"; # Set the input-record-separator to "-" x 21 times
my $i = 0;        # output file number

open IN, "<yourfile.txt" or die "$!";

while (<IN>) {  # Each "record" will be available as $_ 
  do { open F, ">file".($i++); 
       chomp;     # remove the trailing "---..."
       print F;   # write the record to the file
       close F;   #
  } if /^Section/  # do all this only it this is a Section
}

Perl's awk lineage was useful here, so let's show an awk version for comparion:

awk 'BEGIN{RS="\n-+\n";i=0} 
  /Section/ {chomp; print > "file_"(i++)".txt" 
}' yourfile.txt

Not too bad compared to the perl version, it's actually shorter. The $/ in Perl is the RS variable in awk. Awk has an upper hand here: RS may be a regular expression!

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Hey downvoter, do you mind telling me why? :-) –  Faiz Dec 13 '12 at 16:41

You can do with shell too :

#!/bin/bash

i=0
while read line ; do

 #If the line contain "Section " followed by a 
 #digit the next lines have to be printed
 echo "$line"|egrep -q "Section [0-9]+"
 if [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  toprint=true
  i=$(($i + 1))
  touch file$i
 fi

 #If the line contain "--------------------"  
 #the next lines doesn't have to be printed
 echo "$line"|egrep -q "[-]{20}"
 if [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
  toprint=false
 fi

 #Print the line if needed
 if $toprint ; then
  echo $line >> file$i
 fi

done < sections.txt
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Here's what you're looking for:

awk '/^-{21}$/ { f++; next } f%2!=0 { print > "file" (f-1)/2 ".txt" }' file

Results:

Contents of file0.txt:

Section 1
...

Contents of file1.txt:

Section 2
...

Contents of file2.txt:

Section 3
...

As you can see the above filenames are 'zero' indexed. If you'd like filenames 'one' indexed, simply change (f-1)/2 to (f+1)/2. HTH.

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Given your file's format, here's one option:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $fh;
my $sep = '-' x 21;

while (<>) {
    if (/^Section\s+(\d+)/) {
        open $fh, '>', 'file' . ( $1 - 1 ) . '.txt' or die $!;
    }

    print $fh $_ if defined $fh and !/^$sep/;
}

On your data, creates file0.txt .. file2.txt with file0.txt containing:

Section 1
...
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