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If I have a struct and I want to get it's key, but it's currently of type interface{} how do I do that?

Currently I get the following compilation error:

invalid operation: d[label] (index of type interface {})

Play: http://play.golang.org/p/PLr91d55GX

package main

import "fmt"
import "reflect"

type Test struct {
    s string
}

func main() {
    test := Test{s: "blah"}
    fmt.Println(getProp(test, "s"))
}

func getProp(d interface{}, label string) (interface{}, bool) {
    switch reflect.TypeOf(d).Kind() {
    case reflect.Struct:
        _, ok := reflect.TypeOf(d).FieldByName(label)
        if ok {
                    // errors here because interface{} doesn't have index of type 
            return d[label], true
        } else {
            return nil, false
        }
    }
}

Do I really have to do the massive case statement on each different type and call the reflected reflect.ValueOf(x).String() etc? I'm hoping there is a more elegant way.

share|improve this question
    
Well, d is of type interface{}, and you're trying to use it as map (map[key]). Also using it on struct would be mistake, as [] operator can be only used on arrays, slices or maps. –  Maciej Dec 13 '12 at 9:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could do this, however I think it'll only work if your struct member s was an exported field (i.e. use a capital S in your example)

func getProp(d interface{}, label string) (interface{}, bool) {
    switch reflect.TypeOf(d).Kind() {
    case reflect.Struct:
        v := reflect.ValueOf(d).FieldByName(label)
             return v.Interface(), true
    }
   return nil, false
}

(+ some more error handling)

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, Interface() gives me access, and you correct that the field must be exported or it is not accessible by Interface() –  Nucleon Dec 14 '12 at 8:08

I'm not sure exactly what you're looking for, but there is a slightly simpler way to look for interface{} types. In your case, you could use:

switch val := d.(type) {
  case Test:
    fmt.Println(d.s)
}

Obviously, I'm not doing the same thing as you were, but the idea is that you can check the type with "d.(type)", and once "case Test:" determines that it is a struct of your Test type, you can access it as such.

Unfortunately, this doesn't address the accessing of the value within the struct by the label, but it at least is a more elegant way of determining the type, and @nos shows how to do that with

v := reflect.ValueOf(d).FieldByName(label)
return v.Interface(), true
share|improve this answer
    
In this case it is for a templating system, which means I cannot hard code the types for anything and have to use reflection for just about every step. –  Nucleon Dec 14 '12 at 8:10

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