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I would like to explain threading deadlocks to newbies. I have seen many examples for deadlocks in the past, some using code and some using illustrations (like the famous 4 cars). There are also classic easily-deadlocked problems like The Dining Philosophers, but these may be too complex for a real newbie to fully grasp.

I'm looking for the simplest code example to illustrate what deadlocks are. The example should:

  1. Relate to a "real" programming scenario that makes some sense
  2. Be very short, simple and straight forward

What's do you recommend?

Thanks

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why not use the famous 4 cars, as it seems pretty straightforward to me. –  vehomzzz Sep 6 '09 at 14:59
1  
The 4 cars are not a programming scenario, and it's not trivial for a newbie to abstract a problem to the form of the 4 cars. I do use them, but want to show a programming scenario where deadlock occur. –  Roee Adler Sep 6 '09 at 15:01
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18 Answers

Maybe a simple bank situation.

class Account {
  double balance;
  int id;

  void withdraw(double amount){
     balance -= amount;
  } 

  void deposit(double amount){
     balance += amount;
  } 

   void transfer(Account from, Account to, double amount){
        sync(from);
        sync(to);
           from.withdraw(amount);
           to.deposit(amount);
        release(to);
        release(from);
    }

}

Obviously, should there be two threads which attempt to run transfer(a, b) and transfer(b, a) at the same time, then a deadlock is going to occur because they try to acquire the resources in reverse order.

This code is also great for looking at solutions to the deadlock as well. Hope this helps!

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2  
+1 very neat, thanks –  Roee Adler Sep 6 '09 at 15:07
1  
Really nice example! –  Jay Aug 24 '10 at 11:22
    
very nice & simple example –  Naveen Dec 22 '10 at 17:53
    
Indeed, very concise and easy to follow. ;) –  Elliott Nov 14 '12 at 6:43
1  
It would be perfect if you or someone else can give the solution to this issue. –  Jacky Jan 8 '13 at 14:20
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Let nature explain deadlock,

Deadlock: Frog vs. Snake

"I would love to have seen them go their separate ways, but I was exhausted," the photographer said. "The frog was all the time trying to pull the snake off, but the snake just wouldn't let go".

alt text

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9  
Cute, but doesn't explain how deadlocks occur in a programming context. –  jalf Sep 7 '09 at 11:58
    
ok jalf, at least you justified the downvote. Anyway, it's similar to the "4 cars" example. A cute representation of how a deadlock looks like. –  Nick Dandoulakis Sep 7 '09 at 12:30
    
@Nick Dandoulakis: Excellent pictorial presentation. Picture explains the concept of deadlock –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak May 25 '12 at 11:59
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Here's a code example from the computer science department of a university in Taiwan showing a simple java example with resource locking. That's very "real-life" relevant to me. Code below:

/**
 * Adapted from The Java Tutorial
 * Second Edition by Campione, M. and
 * Walrath, K.Addison-Wesley 1998
 */

/**
 * This is a demonstration of how NOT to write multi-threaded programs.
 * It is a program that purposely causes deadlock between two threads that
 * are both trying to acquire locks for the same two resources.
 * To avoid this sort of deadlock when locking multiple resources, all threads
 * should always acquire their locks in the same order.
 **/
public class Deadlock {
  public static void main(String[] args){
    //These are the two resource objects 
    //we'll try to get locks for
    final Object resource1 = "resource1";
    final Object resource2 = "resource2";
    //Here's the first thread.
    //It tries to lock resource1 then resource2
    Thread t1 = new Thread() {
      public void run() {
        //Lock resource 1
        synchronized(resource1){
          System.out.println("Thread 1: locked resource 1");
          //Pause for a bit, simulating some file I/O or 
          //something. Basically, we just want to give the 
          //other thread a chance to run. Threads and deadlock
          //are asynchronous things, but we're trying to force 
          //deadlock to happen here...
          try{ 
            Thread.sleep(50); 
          } catch (InterruptedException e) {}

          //Now wait 'till we can get a lock on resource 2
          synchronized(resource2){
            System.out.println("Thread 1: locked resource 2");
          }
        }
      }
    };

    //Here's the second thread.  
    //It tries to lock resource2 then resource1
    Thread t2 = new Thread(){
      public void run(){
        //This thread locks resource 2 right away
        synchronized(resource2){
          System.out.println("Thread 2: locked resource 2");
          //Then it pauses, for the same reason as the first 
          //thread does
          try{
    		Thread.sleep(50); 
    	  } catch (InterruptedException e){}

          //Then it tries to lock resource1.  
          //But wait!  Thread 1 locked resource1, and 
          //won't release it till it gets a lock on resource2.  
          //This thread holds the lock on resource2, and won't
          //release it till it gets resource1.  
          //We're at an impasse. Neither thread can run, 
          //and the program freezes up.
          synchronized(resource1){
            System.out.println("Thread 2: locked resource 1");
          }
        }
      }
    };

    //Start the two threads. 
    //If all goes as planned, deadlock will occur, 
    //and the program will never exit.
    t1.start(); 
    t2.start();
  }
}
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The problem is that it's not really a "real-life" example. It's about "resource 1" and "resource 2", and it would be nice to actually relate this to an actual programming problem (I mean, directly usable in practice, with reference to the problem domain etc) –  Jay Aug 24 '10 at 11:25
3  
Good example in my opinion. Thanks. –  Jam Jul 8 '12 at 20:10
    
This code seems to have been published in a couple of different books... stackoverflow.com/a/11338853/112705 –  Dan J Sep 17 '12 at 3:25
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One of the simple deadlock example i have come across.

 public class SimpleDeadLock extends Thread {
   public static Object l1 = new Object();
   public static Object l2 = new Object();
   private int index;
   public static void main(String[] a) {
      Thread t1 = new Thread1();
      Thread t2 = new Thread2();
      t1.start();
      t2.start();
   }
   private static class Thread1 extends Thread {
      public void run() {
         synchronized (l1) {
            System.out.println("Thread 1: Holding lock 1...");
            try { Thread.sleep(10); }
            catch (InterruptedException e) {}
            System.out.println("Thread 1: Waiting for lock 2...");
            synchronized (l2) {
               System.out.println("Thread 2: Holding lock 1 & 2...");
            }
         }
      }
   }
   private static class Thread2 extends Thread {
      public void run() {
         synchronized (l2) {
            System.out.println("Thread 2: Holding lock 2...");
            try { Thread.sleep(10); }
            catch (InterruptedException e) {}
            System.out.println("Thread 2: Waiting for lock 1...");
            synchronized (l1) {
               System.out.println("Thread 2: Holding lock 2 & 1...");
            }
         }
      }
   }
}
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I like that example. But why SimpleDeadLock class exends from Thread? That is not necessary. –  Charmin Sep 25 '13 at 8:06
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Please see my answer to this question. Bottom line whenever two threads need to acquire two different resources, and do so in different orders then you can get deadlocks.

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Could you please paste relevant code here? Thanks. –  Roee Adler Sep 6 '09 at 15:00
1  
I don't really see the point in duplicating the information from another answer here. I assume that if you think this answer can be improved you're free to edit it yourself. –  djna Sep 6 '09 at 15:13
    
I think this situation is called "locking inversion". Well, I know it's called locking inversion, because I call it that, but I think that's also the term of art for it :-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 6 '09 at 15:45
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One more simple deadlock example with two different resources and two thread waiting for each other to release resource. Directly from examples.oreilly.com/jenut/Deadlock.java

 public class Deadlock {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    // These are the two resource objects we'll try to get locks for
    final Object resource1 = "resource1";
    final Object resource2 = "resource2";
    // Here's the first thread.  It tries to lock resource1 then resource2
    Thread t1 = new Thread() {
      public void run() {
        // Lock resource 1
        synchronized(resource1) {
          System.out.println("Thread 1: locked resource 1");

          // Pause for a bit, simulating some file I/O or something.  
          // Basically, we just want to give the other thread a chance to
          // run.  Threads and deadlock are asynchronous things, but we're
          // trying to force deadlock to happen here...
          try { Thread.sleep(50); } catch (InterruptedException e) {}

          // Now wait 'till we can get a lock on resource 2
          synchronized(resource2) {
            System.out.println("Thread 1: locked resource 2");
          }
        }
      }
    };

    // Here's the second thread.  It tries to lock resource2 then resource1
    Thread t2 = new Thread() {
      public void run() {
        // This thread locks resource 2 right away
        synchronized(resource2) {
          System.out.println("Thread 2: locked resource 2");

          // Then it pauses, for the same reason as the first thread does
          try { Thread.sleep(50); } catch (InterruptedException e) {}

          // Then it tries to lock resource1.  But wait!  Thread 1 locked
          // resource1, and won't release it 'till it gets a lock on
          // resource2.  This thread holds the lock on resource2, and won't
          // release it 'till it gets resource1.  We're at an impasse. Neither
          // thread can run, and the program freezes up.
          synchronized(resource1) {
            System.out.println("Thread 2: locked resource 1");
          }
        }
      }
    };

    // Start the two threads. If all goes as planned, deadlock will occur, 
    // and the program will never exit.
    t1.start(); 
    t2.start();
  }
}
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I consider the Dining Philosophers problem to be one of the more simple examples in showing deadlocks though, since the 4 deadlock requirements can be easily illustrated by the drawing (especially the circular wait).

I consider real world examples to be much more confusing to the newbie, though I can't think of a good real world scenario off the top of my head right now (I'm relatively inexperienced with real-world concurrency).

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Some real life not-so-serious examples can be found here and here :)

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If you could paste the gist of those articles in the body of the answer it would be great, thanks... –  Roee Adler Sep 6 '09 at 15:08
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If method1() and method2() both will be called by two or many threads , there is a good chance of deadlock because if thead 1 aquires lock on Sting object while executing method1() and thread 2 acquires lock on Integer object while executing method2() both will be waiting for each other to release lock on Integer and String to proceed further which will never happen.

    public void method1() {
    synchronized (String.class) {
        System.out.println("Aquired lock on String.class object");

        synchronized (Integer.class) {
            System.out.println("Aquired lock on Integer.class object");
        }
    }
}

public void method2() {
    synchronized (Integer.class) {
        System.out.println("Aquired lock on Integer.class object");

        synchronized (String.class) {
            System.out.println("Aquired lock on String.class object");
        }
    }
}
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Nice example, clearly describes deadlock concept. –  akash746 Dec 24 '13 at 17:15
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The producers-consumers problem together with the dining philosophers' problem is probably as simple as it's going to get. It has some pseudocode that illustrates it, as well. If those are too complex for a newbie they'd better try harder to grasp them.

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Go for the simplist possible scenario in which deadlock can occur when introducting the concept to your students. This would involve a minimum of two threads and a minimum of two resources (I think). The goal being to engineer a scenario in which the first thread has a lock on resource one, and is waiting for the lock on resource two to be released, whilst at the same time thread two holds a lock on resource two, and is waiting for the lock on resource one to be released.

It doesn't really matter what the underlying resources are; for simplicities sake, you could just make them a pair of files that both threads are able to write to.

EDIT: This assumes no inter-process communication other than the locks held.

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I know this question has already been answered, but here is another simple example: this time using C++11

#include <mutex>    // mutex
#include <iostream> // cout 
#include <cstdio>   // getchar
#include <thread>   // this_thread, yield
#include <future>   // async
#include <chrono>   // seconds

using namespace std;
mutex _m1;
mutex _m2;

// Deadlock will occur because func12 and func21 acquires the two locks in reverse order

void func12()
{
    unique_lock<mutex> l1(_m1);
    this_thread::yield(); // hint to reschedule
    this_thread::sleep_for( chrono::seconds(1) );
    unique_lock<mutex> l2(_m2 );
}

void func21()
{
    unique_lock<mutex> l2(_m2);
    this_thread::yield(); // hint to reschedule
    this_thread::sleep_for( chrono::seconds(1) );
    unique_lock<mutex> l1(_m1);
}

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    async(func12);
    func21();
    cout << "All done!"; // this won't be executed because of deadlock
    getchar();
}
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I recently realized that the fights between couples are nothing but a deadlock.. where usually one of the process has to crash to resolve it, of course it's the lesser priority one(Boy ;)).

Here's the analogy...

Process1: Girl(G) Process2: Boy(B)
Resource1: Sorry Resource2: Accepting own mistake

Necessary Conditions:
1. Mutual Exclusion: Only one of G or B can say sorry or accept own Mistake at a time.
2. Hold and Wait: At a time, one is holding Sorry and other Accepting own mistake, one is waiting for Accepting own mistake to release sorry, and other is waiting for sorry to release accepting own mistake.
3. No preemption: Not even God can force B or G to release Sorry or Accepting own mistake. And voluntarily? Are you kidding me??
4. Circular Wait: Again, the one holding sorry waits for other to accept own mistakes, and one holding accept own mistakes want other to say sorry first. So it's circular.

So deadlocks occur when all these conditions are in effect at the same time, and that's always the case in a couple fight ;)

Source: http://www.quora.com/Saurabh-Pandey-3/Posts/Never-ending-couple-fights-a-deadlock

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Reader Writer Problem (for Database or for file ) can be a good example for deadlock, because it matches with our daily programming and software development habits or we faces them very often.

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Here's a simple deadlock in c#

void UpdateLabel(string text) {
   lock(this) {
      if(MyLabel.InvokeNeeded) {
        IAsyncResult res =  MyLable.BeginInvoke(delegate() {
             MyLable.Text = text;
            });
         MyLabel.EndInvoke(res);
        } else {
             MyLable.Text = text;
        }
    }
}

If, one day, you call this from the GUI thread, and another thread calls it as well - you might deadlock. The other thread gets to EndInvoke, waits for the GUI thread to execute the delegate while holding the lock. The GUI thread blocks on the same lock waiting for the other thread to release it - which it will not because the GUI thread will never be available to execute the delegate the other thread is waiting for. (ofcourse the lock here isn't strictly needed - nor is perhaps the EndInvoke, but in a slightly more complex scenario, a lock might be acquired by the caller for other reasons, resulting in the same deadlock.)

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I found that a bit hard to understand when reading the dining philosophers' problem, deadlock IMHO is actually related to resource allocation. Would like to share a more simple example where 2 Nurse need to fight for 3 equipment in order to complete a task. Although it's written in java. A simple lock() method is created to simulate how the deadlock happen, so it can apply in other programming language as well. http://www.justexample.com/wp/example-of-deadlock/

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I know this question has already been answered, but here is another simple example: this time using C++11

#include <mutex>    // mutex
#include <iostream> // cout 
#include <cstdio>   // getchar
#include <thread>   // this_thread, yield
#include <future>   // async
#include <chrono>   // seconds

using namespace std;
mutex _m1;
mutex _m2;

// Deadlock will occur because func12 and func21 acquires the two locks in reverse order

void func12()
{
    unique_lock<mutex> l1(_m1, chrono::seconds(1));
    this_thread::yield(); // hint to reschedule
    this_thread::sleep_for( chrono::seconds(1) );
    unique_lock<mutex> l2(_m2 );
}

void func21()
{
    unique_lock<mutex> l2(_m2);
    this_thread::yield(); // hint to reschedule
    this_thread::sleep_for( chrono::seconds(1) );
    unique_lock<mutex> l1(_m1);
}

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    async(func12);
    func21();
    cout << "All done!"; // this won't be executed because of deadlock
    getchar();
}
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package test.concurrent;
public class DeadLockTest {
   private static long sleepMillis;
   private final Object lock1 = new Object();
   private final Object lock2 = new Object();

   public static void main(String[] args) {
       sleepMillis = Long.parseLong(args[0]);
       DeadLockTest test = new DeadLockTest();
       test.doTest();
   }

   private void doTest() {
       Thread t1 = new Thread(new Runnable() {
           public void run() {
               lock12();
           }
       });
       Thread t2 = new Thread(new Runnable() {
           public void run() {
               lock21();
           }
       });
       t1.start();
       t2.start();
   }

   private void lock12() {
       synchronized (lock1) {
           sleep();
           synchronized (lock2) {
               sleep();
           }
       }
   }

   private void lock21() {
       synchronized (lock2) {
           sleep();
           synchronized (lock1) {
               sleep();
           }
       }
   }

   private void sleep() {
       try {
           Thread.sleep(sleepMillis);
       } catch (InterruptedException e) {
           e.printStackTrace();
       }
   }
}
To run the deadlock test with sleep time 1 millisecond:
java -cp . test.concurrent.DeadLockTest 1
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