Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There is a known bug in webkit that when you remove an image from the DOM, it doesn't free the memory associated with it.

This is an issue with single page apps that often load images.

Various suggested solutions are:

The first 3 methods don't work for me. The main drawback to recycling image elements is that it means writing lots of code to manage that. I'm loading new HTML via AJAX that may contain images, so I don't necessarily know the number of images that will be loaded.

Are there any other work arounds to fix this problem?

share|improve this question
2  
I don't think an image pool would be that much code; and it can easily support an arbitrary number or images. –  Bergi Dec 13 '12 at 11:42
    
And what's wrong with removing src attribute? –  raina77ow Dec 13 '12 at 11:42
    
Depending on what (and if) library you're using you could wrap the node removing function to handle that special case with removing src first before removing img itself. –  WTK Dec 13 '12 at 12:04
    
Just updated my question - removing the src attribute doesn't work for me. –  andyuk Dec 13 '12 at 12:08
1  
how can you not know the number of images if you are manually calling the Image() constructor for each image (the cause of the linked bug). i don't think issues injecting html with img tags are covered by this bug. –  dandavis Dec 28 '13 at 7:31

4 Answers 4

I have used 3 different types of approaches...

First. Did add a set of images and left the garbage collection to browser. enter image description here

It definitely garbage collected, but after a while, making sure that there exists no need for the images which have been created.

Second. Used a data:URI patterns for the src for images.

var s = "data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAUAAAAFCAYAAACNbyblAAAAHElEQVQI12P4//8/w38GIAXDIBKE0DHxgljNBAAO9TXL0Y4OHwAAAABJRU5ErkJggg==";

for (var i = 0; i < 100; i++){
    var img = document.createElement("img");
    img.src = s;
document.getElementById("myList1").appendChild(img);
setTimeout(function(){img = null;}, 1000);
}

enter image description here

This looked similar, though a bit better for me as I was watching in front of my browser and observed a lesser memory was used, and garbage collection was almost the same as above.

Third. Did garbage collection in code.

var s = "data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAUAAAAFCAYAAACNbyblAAAAHElEQVQI12P4//8/w38GIAXDIBKE0DHxgljNBAAO9TXL0Y4OHwAAAABJRU5ErkJggg==";

for (var i = 0; i < 100; i++){
    var img = document.createElement("img");
    img.src = "dot.png";  // or the other, both mean the same here.
    img.src = s;
document.getElementById("myList1").appendChild(img);
setTimeout(function(){img = null;}, 1000);
}

enter image description here

In this short time of testing, I believed that the last approach worked better, as it was almost freeing the space up immediately without waiting to see if there was any need for the referenced images further.

All in all, You better use garbage collection by yourself, when you absolutely feel like something must be freed off.

share|improve this answer
    
By using data:URI you're missing out on all the browser HTTP caching... in a production application this will be very noticeable. –  Ped Jan 3 at 15:37
    
Valid point. I normally put all of them within css or js and cache those assets. –  sivatumma Jan 3 at 15:42
    
yeah, but it appears in this application, images are the content, so it won't work. –  Ped Jan 3 at 15:43
    
How can't ? I am not wishing to oppose you, but how can't this approach work at all ? put a js file that contains all the src variables and cache that. img1 ="fjsa;lfs=", img2="fjasdjfs=", etc. It looks like it can work without any problem even for this question. –  sivatumma Jan 3 at 15:46
    
@sivatumma I think what Ped meant was that you wouldn't know all the images beforehand. For example think of a scenario where you upload images to the application to be shown. You couldn't possibly know the file name to put it in the JS file beforehand. –  Can't Tell Jan 7 at 10:24

A basic image pool should allow you to recycle img elements for re-use. Since you don't know how many images there will be total ahead of time, just have the pool size expand as necessary.

Something like this should work:

    function getImg( id, src, alt ) {
        var pool = document.getElementById( 'image_pool' );
        var img = ( pool.children.length > 0 ) ? pool.removeChild( pool.children[0] ) : document.createElement( 'img' );
        img.id = id;
        img.src = src;
        img.alt = alt;
        return img;
    }
    function recycleImg( id ) {
        var img = document.getElementById( id );
        document.getElementById( 'image_pool' ).appendChild( img.parentNode.removeChild( img ) );
    }

Place a hidden "image_pool" container on your page somewhere, to hide the recycled images between usage:

<div id="image_pool" style="display:none;"></div>

Then any time you need a new img element, call:

document.getElementById( 'some_element_id' ).appendChild( getImg( 'my_image_id', 'images/hello.gif', 'alt_text' ) );

And when you are done with it:

recycleImg( 'my_image_id' );

jQuery alternative

    function getImg( id, src, alt ) {
        var img;
        if( $("#image_pool").children().length > 0 ) {
            return $("#image_pool img:first-child").attr( { 'id': id, 'src': src, 'alt': alt } ).detach();
        }
        return $( "<img />'" ).attr( { 'id': id, 'src': src, 'alt': alt } );
    }
    function recycleImg( id ) {
        $( "#" + id ).detach().appendTo( $("#image_pool") );
    }

When you need a new img element:

getImg( 'my_image_id', 'images/hello.gif', 'alt_text' ).appendTo( $( "#some_element_id" ) );

(recycling works the same as above)

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not sure, but detaching in JQuery actually destroys the node, and appendTo creates a new node in the DOM. So there is actually no recycle at all. –  Guillermo Gutiérrez Jan 3 at 14:29
    
Interesting, I'd have to look at the source code to verify. Either way, I'll add here a version not using jQuery functions, just for reference. –  paulscode Jan 3 at 14:34
    
Posted the question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/20905866/… –  Guillermo Gutiérrez Jan 3 at 15:55
    
Thanks for asking the question, @GuillermoGutiérrez Sounds like the element is preserved in both detach() and remove() functions, so in the case of my above code, the element should be properly recycled as intended. –  paulscode Jan 3 at 16:32

What about setting the images as backgrounds to divs? I believe Flickr is doing something like this for their mobile html5 app.

share|improve this answer

Try setting the Javascript DOM tree object to "null".

First, using something like the chrome developer tool interface, locate the object in the DOM tree hierarchy and inspect it and find the object that contains the binary of your image.

Try setting that object to null, such as var obj = null;.

That should tell Javascript that the child is no longer referenced and force the object's memory to be freed.

share|improve this answer
4  
What exactly do you mean with "Javscript objects themselves are not garbage collected"? Needs more explanation, or is - in general - wrong. –  Bergi Dec 14 '12 at 8:43
    
Sorry, Yes, they are garbage collected, but not always immediately - have you tried setting to 'null' as I suggested? Did it help? Did using the chrome to locate the object in the DOM tree help either? –  Michael R. Hines Dec 26 '12 at 18:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.