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This code is horrible and I am only searching for one property (CompanyName). How do I write this query dynamically or in any case better?

   public List<SubContractor> GetSearchSubcontractorList()
    {
        var list = CacheObjects.Subcontractors;
        var searchItem = string.Empty;
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(this.SearchCompanyName) == false)
        {
            var indexes = this.SearchCompanyName.IndexOfAll("*").ToList();
            if (indexes.Any() == false)
            {
                list = list.Where(x => x.CompanyName == this.SearchCompanyName).ToList();
            }

            if (indexes.Count() == 1)
            {
                if (this.SearchCompanyName.StartsWith("*"))
                {
                    searchItem = this.SearchCompanyName.Replace("*", string.Empty);
                    list = list.Where(x => x.CompanyName.EndsWith(searchItem)).ToList();
                }
                else
                {
                    searchItem = this.SearchCompanyName.Replace("*", string.Empty);
                    list = list.Where(x => x.CompanyName.StartsWith(searchItem)).ToList();
                }
            }

            if (indexes.Count() == 2)
            {
                searchItem = this.SearchCompanyName.Replace("*", string.Empty);
                list = list.Where(x => x.CompanyName.Contains(searchItem)).ToList();
            }
        }

        return list;
    }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Oh sorry i mis-undertood. I edited, check out new solution. I think you only have 4 different cases to test right? No wildcard, starts with wildcard, ends with wildcard, wildcard on both ends. New solution uses delayed query execution, so that you can continue to build up your query with more properties. Fair warning, still not complied...

    var filteredSubcontractors = (from s in list
                             select s);

    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(this.SearchCompanyName) == false)
    {
        searchItem = this.SearchCompanyName.Replace("*", string.Empty);

        if (!SearchCompanyName.Contains("*"))
        {
            filteredSubcontractors = (from s in filteredSubcontractors 
                             where s.CompanyName == this.SearchCompanyName
                             select s);
        }
        else if(SearchCompanyName.StartsWith("*"))
        {      
            filteredSubcontractors = (from s in filteredSubcontractors 
                             where s.CompanyName.EndsWith(searchItem)
                             select s);
        }
        else if(SearchCompanyName.EndsWith("*"))
        {
            filteredSubcontractors = (from s in filteredSubcontractors 
                             where s.CompanyName.StartsWith(searchItem)
                             select s);
        }
        else
        {
            filteredSubcontractors = (from s in filteredSubcontractors 
                             where s.CompanyName.Contains(searchItem)
                             select s);
        }
    }

    ...
    //Repeat for as many other properties that you want to filter on
    ...

    //All the conditions that you added will not actually be evaluated 
    //until this line is executed.
    var result = filteredSubcontractors.ToList();

    return result;

You can also check out this stack overflow question. There are a lot of other ideas in here (probably better than mine). Generating LinqToEntities Where statement depending on the user selection

share|improve this answer
    
The * is a wildcard for a search. Apologies if that is not clear. So * will either not exist, or be at the beginning or at the end or both. That is why I wrote the code the way it is. –  arame3333 Dec 13 '12 at 14:10
    
oh got it, check out new answer, see if that's better. –  Ben Tidman Dec 13 '12 at 14:20
    
Yes it is better, although it does not work properly. I would need to check whether the search string starts and ends with * before the condition to do with StartWith. However my other concern is that I will have to do the same code for all the other search conditions, for example SearchCompanyAddress. I cannot see a way of abstracting this code to avoid repeating myself. –  arame3333 Dec 13 '12 at 14:45
    
Edited again. You are still going to end up with a fair amount of code, but at least it won't be exponential for every new property that you want to test. The thing that I think will help you is to read a little about delayed query execution from linq. It allows you to dynamically build your query. –  Ben Tidman Dec 13 '12 at 15:27
    
Thank you for that. The final Contains clause should be executed when the searchstring looks like @abc@ and will never be reached in your code. That was why I wrote some of the code the way I did originally. Looking at the wider problem I think you are possibly right, but it surprises me there isn't a way to abstract this code. There is no point in lazy loading as I am querying a collection of cached objects in the first place, rather than a database. –  arame3333 Dec 13 '12 at 16:35

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