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With this query

SELECT
o1.created,
SEC_TO_TIME(TIMESTAMPDIFF(second, o1.created, (SELECT MAX(created) FROM orders o2 WHERE o2.created < o1.created and o2.created >= '2012-06-01'))) tsd
FROM
orders o1
WHERE o1.created >= '2012-06-01'
ORDER BY tsd DESC LIMIT 100

I want to find out, if there were any significant times in which no orders were placed and how long this timespan was.

Here's the explain:

*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: PRIMARY
        table: o1
         type: range
possible_keys: created
          key: created
      key_len: 4
          ref: NULL
         rows: 2649278
        Extra: Using where; Using index; Using filesort
*************************** 2. row ***************************
           id: 2
  select_type: DEPENDENT SUBQUERY
        table: o2
         type: range
possible_keys: created
          key: created
      key_len: 4
          ref: NULL
         rows: 2649278
        Extra: Using where; Using index

created is of type timestamp.

The query runs for over an hour now. Changing anything in the schema isn't an option. This is a one-time query, but I'm just curious if performance can be boosted.

share|improve this question
    
You're scanning 2.5 million rows 2.5 million times, I'd consider self-joining instead of subquerying –  Alex Dec 13 '12 at 12:41
    
Could add another column to orders, then when inserting a new order update the previous order with the time difference between them? Order writes become marginally slower, but you query finding the difference should be a lot fast! Not helpful for current situation though. Could go back and populate I suppose –  cosmorogers Dec 13 '12 at 12:42
    
@cosmorogers Changing anything in the schema isn't an option. This is a one-time query anyways. I'm just curious. But thanks for your input. –  fancyPants Dec 13 '12 at 12:43
    
@Alex Could you tell me how you would write the query? The way I would write it I see no benefit in it. –  fancyPants Dec 13 '12 at 12:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try to use this query. Is it faster?

SQLFiddle demo

select created,Previous_created,
       IF(tsd<>0,SEC_TO_TIME(tsd),0) as diff 
from
(
 select created,
       IF(@prev<>0,TIMESTAMPDIFF(second, @prev,created),0) tsd,
       @prev Previous_created,
       @prev:=created f2 
    from orders,(select @prev:=0) t1 
WHERE created >= '2012-06-01'
order by created
 ) t2 
order by tsd desc limit 100
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, it's incredibly fast. Thank you so much. –  fancyPants Dec 13 '12 at 14:23

I'd try to go with solution without subquery:

select o1.created, TIMESTAMPDIFF(second, o1.created, o3.created) tsd 
from orders o1
inner join orders o2 on o2.created < o1.created and o2.created >= '2012-06-01'
left join orders o3 on o3.created > o2.created
where o1.created >= '2012-06-01' and o3.id is null;

It might be a lot faster if created column is indexed. I'm afraid that ordering by diff column can't be indexed in mysql though.

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