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When I use the history.go(-1) command as follows it works fine, but takes very long to reaload the page.

<script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">
     javascript:history.go(-1);
</script>

But when I try and use it in my php code, it just gives me an error "Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage". Here is my code

<?php header(sprintf("Location: %s", "javascript:window.history.go(-1);")); ?>

In ff and chrome this works really well, it quickly returns to previous page, without reloading. Not so in ie.

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That works in Chrome and Firefox?? That's scary. –  Sean Bright Dec 13 '12 at 12:54
    
1  
You're putting this in your location header? Why? Also, which version of IE are you referring to? –  Jonathan Sampson Dec 13 '12 at 12:57
    
Just don't do this. The header is for HTTP, not for JS! –  looper Dec 13 '12 at 13:06
1  
AJAX isn't an option? –  Gary Dec 13 '12 at 13:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The common way to go back to the previous page is not to pass JavaScript into your header, but instead to direct the user to the referer of the current page:

header("Location: " . $_SERVER["HTTP_REFERER"]);

Since you said you're using IE9, you should know that IE9 doesn't support the HTML5 History API. Moving forward you can rest assured that IE10 does support this, but for IE9 you won't be able to use these methods without using something like History.js.

If you simply want to load a page asynchronously, you can use an XHR object, or a tool like jQuery which greatly simplifies the otherwise verbose code. With jQuery you can load a page as trivially as:

$("#container").load("targetPage.php #container");

Which would load the contents of #container from targetPage.php into your #container element on the current page.

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3  
Note: always use exit; after header('location:'.$url); and you should use header function before you send content to browser. otherwise it will produce E_Warning "headers already sent". –  Leri Dec 13 '12 at 13:05
    
Upvoted, @PLB. Very important things that are too often forgotten. –  Jonathan Sampson Dec 13 '12 at 13:07
    
Thanks, that does work, but it reloads the previous page. What I want is that it returns to the exact state and position of the previous page, without reloading it. –  user1900937 Dec 13 '12 at 13:14
    
@user1900937 IE9 doesn't support the History APIs. –  Jonathan Sampson Dec 13 '12 at 13:52

try this one:

history.back(1);
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