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I have this code :

' Option Explicit
Public Function Clean(Text)
    On Error Resume Next
    ' Dim Chars As ?????????
    Chars = Array("\", "/", ":", "*", "?", """", "<", ">", "|")
    For Each Replaced In Chars
        Text = Replace(Text, Replaced, "")
    Next
    Clean = CStr(Text)
End Function

But i got an error when use Option Explicit because the Chars is not declared, but what type must i use to dim an array (Dim Chars As ???????)?

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@george : Thanks for edit, it looks better now... –  faid Dec 13 '12 at 15:46
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Corrected version:

Option Explicit

Public Function Clean(ByVal Text As String)
    Dim Chars As Variant
    Dim Replaced As Variant

    Chars = Array("\", "/", ":", "*", "?", """", "<", ">", "|")
    For Each Replaced In Chars
        Text = Replace(Text, Replaced, "")
    Next
    Clean = Text
End Function

Generally better performing version:

Option Explicit

Public Function Clean(ByVal Text As String)
    Dim Chars As Variant
    Dim RepIndex As Long

    Chars = Array("\", "/", ":", "*", "?", """", "<", ">", "|")
    For RepIndex = 0 To UBound(Chars)
        Text = Replace$(Text, Chars(RepIndex), "")
    Next
    Clean = Text
End Function

Understanding Variants is important, and one should be especially conscious of using the Variant version of string functions instead of the String-typed versions suffixed with the "$" type decoration.

Most of the time you'll want to avoid Variants when you can because of performance costs.

This version probably performs even better:

Option Explicit

Public Function Clean(ByVal Text As String)
    Const Chars As String = "\/:*?""<>|"
    Dim RepIndex As Long

    For RepIndex = 1 To Len(Chars)
        Text = Replace$(Text, Mid$(Chars, RepIndex, 1), "")
    Next
    Clean = Text
End Function

There is no "Char" type in VB6, nor is there any initialization syntax on variable declaration.

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Whoa, thanks for suggestion buddy, i must try this all, it's looks better... –  faid Dec 13 '12 at 13:28
    
For curiosity sake, I ran the different versions plus one more I wrote using regular expressions. I tested it using this test string: "nc834u\7238/4037*?". The first version took 30 seconds to run 100,000 times. The second & third versions each took 23 seconds to run 1,000,000 times. And the regular expression took 17 seconds to 1,000,000 times. A modest increase. I should note that the increase was only apparent when compiled and run as an exe. When running in interpreted mode, it ran the same time as versions 2 & 3. I'll post my code in a separate comment in case anyone wants it. –  Tom Collins Dec 13 '12 at 15:52
    
Function Clean1(S As String) As String Dim regex As New RegExp regex.Pattern = "[\\/:\?\*\""\<\>\|]" regex.IgnoreCase = True regex.Global = True Clean1 = regex.Replace(S, "") End Function Note: You'll have to add the reference to Microsoft VBScript Regular Expressions for this to work. –  Tom Collins Dec 13 '12 at 15:54
    
@TimCollins: Try caching the instance creation (Static?) -- it will get order of magnitude faster. –  wqw Dec 13 '12 at 19:17
    
If speed is truly important there are other optimizations that can be done such as not using Replace$(), converting to ANSI when applicable and chewing that over, etc. The point of my suggestions was that just by avoiding known problem areas you get benefits with little or no cost. –  Bob77 Dec 14 '12 at 3:39
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you can dim it as an array of strings you won't need a variant to do so

Dim Chars() As String
Chars = Split("\,/,:,*,?,"",<,>,|", ",")
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Arrays are declared in the same manner as other variables (i.e. using the keywords "Dim", "Private", "Public", etc.), except that the array bounds are coded in parentheses following the variable name (if a fixed-length array is being declared) or an empty pair of parentheses follow the variable name (if a variable-length, or dynamic array is being declared).

 Dim Chars As Variant
 Chars = Array("\", "/", ":", "*", "?", """", "<", ">", "|")

http://www.vb6.us/tutorials/understanding-arrays

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Your code actually doesn't works, but thanks for your link, now i declare it as Variant –  faid Dec 13 '12 at 13:12
    
Rather than saying it doesn't work can you provide an error message? –  Darren Davies Dec 13 '12 at 13:13
    
It's error when i type it, because my vb6 can't have an equal after DIM Dim Whatever As Whatever = Whatever, so the error is not show anything, it just highlight the = symbol... –  faid Dec 13 '12 at 13:18
    
How can this be an accepted answer? The provided answer isn't legal VB6 at all. –  Bob77 Dec 13 '12 at 13:26
    
I accept this because he give me the link for- learn more about Arrays... –  faid Dec 13 '12 at 15:48
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