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Could anyone explain these undefined behaviors (i = i++ + ++i , i = i++, etc…)

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
  char a[]="Hello";
  char *p=a;
  while(*p)
    ++*p++;     //Statement 2
    printf("%s",a);
    int x=10;
    ++x++; //Statement 1
   return 0;
}

When i compile this code i get an l-value Required error in Statement 1, which i can understand. How is that statement 2 does not produce an error even though i intend to do the same thing? Can someone shed light?

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marked as duplicate by Lundin, WhozCraig, Explosion Pills, Deefour, Ram kiran Dec 14 '12 at 2:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
p is modified twice between sequence points so this is undefined behavior. –  Lundin Dec 13 '12 at 13:36
3  
@Lundin No, it isn't. ++*p++ is ++(*(p++)), p is modified only once, no UB. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 13 '12 at 13:48
    
Ok, one question: WHY do you want to write such a code, without brackets? use proper brackets & the behaviour would be predictable + readable. –  anishsane Dec 13 '12 at 13:55
    
@DanielFischer Oops I meant x. ++x++ is undefined behavior. –  Lundin Dec 13 '12 at 14:03
    
@Lundin It would be if it compiled, indeed. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 13 '12 at 14:10

3 Answers 3

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
  char a[]="Hello";
  char *p=a;
  while(*p)
    ++*p++;     //Statement 2
    printf("%s",a);
    int x=10;
    ++x=x++; //Statement 1
   return 0;
}

//this code will fetch same error due to the simultaneous pre and post increment. because it cannot assign and increment simultaneously it require a value to perform increment on it.

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Both pre-increment and post-increment produce rvalues and rvalues can't be modified.

So ++x++ (statement 1) is clearly a constraint violation and compiler gives error.

But it's not the case with the statement 2. Though p++ produces an rvalue which its value can't be modified, it can be dereferenced. Alternatively if you do ++p++ this would be equivalent to the ++x++ case and would give an error. Because here the pointer itself is modified.

So it's equivalent to: ++(*p++).

(Note that the brackets are only for understanding and it's not required. The expression ++*p++ is well-defined.)

What happens is:

  • The post-increment p++ evaluates to the old value of p, in this example &a[0], and the stored value of p is incremented.
  • *p++ gives the value p pointed to before the increment, in this example a[0].
  • The final pre-increment increments that value, so a[0] becomes I (probably, could be something else on EBCDIC machines).

When the incremented values of p and a[0] are stored is unspecified, but both must have been stored at the next sequence point (the terminating ;).

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You have a bad formulation with "which was dereferenced by the post-increment". I know you mean the correct thing, and I don't know how to put it well, but that reads wrong. (I upvote in anticipation of an improved formulation.) –  Daniel Fischer Dec 13 '12 at 13:50
    
@DanielFischer I was kind of felt that when I wrote it. Not really sure how to re-word it. Does it look better? –  KingsIndian Dec 13 '12 at 13:57
    
I have tried to explain it better, if you don't like it at all, roll back. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 13 '12 at 14:07
    
@DanielFischer Thanks. Looks much clearer than what I had. Never thought writing the expression ++*p++ in plain English would be so hard :) –  KingsIndian Dec 13 '12 at 14:13

Quoting from ISO C99 standard :

6.5.2.4 Postfix increment and decrement operators

Constraints
1
The operand of the postfix increment or decrement operator shall have qualified or unqualified real or pointer type and shall be a modifiable lvalue.

For this case :

++*p++;     //Statement 2

postfix ++ has higher precedence and prefix ++ and * has same precedence and right to left associativity. It means at first step it's incrementing the pointer not it's value. So it will give you the next address of that type. And then value (which is actually *p) is incremented. So ,In this case no constraint violation. It's same as ++(*(p++)).

For other case below:

 int x=10;
 ++x++; //Statement 1

In the above case of variable(not pointer) ++(Either postfix or prefix increment or decrement) give you the rvalue ,then applying ++ or -- on rvalue is constraint violation.++ or -- operand should be an lvalue . See the Standard quote written above. Hence giving error.

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Postfix ++ has higher precedence than unary * and prefix ++ both. You seem to have confused this. No matter, the code is undefined behavior, so it doesn't fill any purpose trying to figure out what it will do. –  Lundin Dec 13 '12 at 13:40
    
@Lundin : Don't pretty sure about undefined behavior but ++ and * has same precedence... –  Omkant Dec 13 '12 at 13:44
    
@Lundin : The C programming by K & R in chapter 2 2.12 Precedence and Order of Evaluation see the table of operators given.And what the problem with ++(*(p++)) expression , can you please explain ? –  Omkant Dec 13 '12 at 13:48
    
You have 3 different operators, postfix ++, prefix ++ and unary *. Their precedence is specified in C11 6.5/3: The grouping of operators and operands is indicated by the syntax. This means, the order of operator appearance in the C standard chapter 6.5 states the operator's precedence. Postfix ++ appears in 6.5.2 so it has higher precedence than prefix ++ and unary *, the latter two appear in 6.5.3 and have the same precedence, but are evaluated right-to-left in relation to each other. –  Lundin Dec 13 '12 at 13:49
    
++(*(p++)) : p++ the next address, then *(p++) will be the value of that address and then ++(*(p++)) will give you the incremented value. I have parsed like this , Am I wrong ? –  Omkant Dec 13 '12 at 13:50

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