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I am trying to write/read multibyte array directly to/from file, and was suggested using PInvoke WriteFile/ReadFile.

Basically my reading code looks like this now:

[DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
static extern unsafe int ReadFile(IntPtr handle, IntPtr bytes, uint numBytesToRead,
  IntPtr numBytesRead, System.Threading.NativeOverlapped* overlapped);

..<cut>..

byte[,,] mb = new byte[1024,1024,1024];
fixed(byte * fb = mb)
{
    FileStream fs = new FileStream(@"E:\SHARED\TEMP", FileMode.Open);
    int bytesread = 0;
    ReadFile(fs.SafeFileHandle.DangerousGetHandle(), (IntPtr)fb, Convert.ToUInt32(mb.Length), new IntPtr(bytesread), null);
    fs.Close();
}

This code throws an AccessViolationException. However, the following code does not:

[DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
static extern unsafe int ReadFile(IntPtr handle, IntPtr bytes, uint numBytesToRead,
  ref int numBytesRead, System.Threading.NativeOverlapped* overlapped);

..<cut>..

byte[,,] mb = new byte[1024,1024,1024];
fixed(byte * fb = mb)
{
    FileStream fs = new FileStream(@"E:\SHARED\TEMP", FileMode.Open);
    int bytesread = 0;
    ReadFile(fs.SafeFileHandle.DangerousGetHandle(), (IntPtr)fb, Convert.ToUInt32(mb.Length), ref bytesread, null);
    fs.Close();
}

The difference is that I declare numBytesRead to be ref int rather than IntPtr.

However, everywhere where I find an answer to a question "how to get IntPtr to an int", it goes like:

int x = 0;
IntPtr ptrtox = new IntPtr(x)

So, what am I doing wrong? Why access violation?

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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The reason you get an Access Violation is because new IntPtr(x) creates a pointer whose address is the contents of x. so you have created a NULL pointer when x = 0.

The IntPtr constructor does not get the address of its argument. It isn't equivalent to the & operator in C/C++.

You want to use the ref argument for bytes read; that is the proper way. Furthermore, you always want to use a GCHandle to get the address of a managed object, so use it on your mb array, not fixed. Just don't keep the handle for long, and don't forget to free it.

-reilly.

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I am using IntPtr for bytes read because I want to read into multidimensional array. Any multidimensional array. That way, i can make a simple virtual wrapper for all cases, and I pass byte[,] or byte[,,] or whatever to the same function and it will work, because "fixed (byte* fixedByteArray = buffer)" doesnt care how many dimensions does buffer has. But if i declare ref byte[,] i cannot pass byte[,,] for example –  Istrebitel Dec 13 '12 at 13:52
    
You misunderstood me. I do not advocate using ref byte[]; I advocate using ref int for the numBytesRead. I tell you to get rid of the fixed on the array and use the GCHandle to pin it in memory during the read operation. –  Reilly Dec 13 '12 at 18:22
    
Why would he get rid of fixed? Fixed is better for localized use (as long as you can use an unsafe context). GCHandle is better for persistent use where a fixed block can't be used. –  Stephen Martin Dec 13 '12 at 20:13
    
Thanks, I understand. –  Istrebitel Dec 14 '12 at 6:41
    
I advocate getting rid of "fixed" because unsafe code requires that the CLR only execute code from a fully trusted assembly. This is a requirement that you may not want. –  Reilly Sep 11 '13 at 17:45
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That's easy. See this little piece you're doing:

new IntPtr(bytesread)

That doesn't do what you think it does. You think that it makes a new pointer that points to your variable bytesread. It doesn't. It makes a pointer that points to an address with the value of bytesread, which is 0. The unmanaged code reads, then tries to write a number into the memory pointed to by the null pointer, which fails.

The other version works because the argument is declared as ref int which will make the marshaller pass an actual pointer to bytesread instead of the value.

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Okay, so the correct way to make a pointer to bytesread is to use the "pin" construct proposed by Peter Wishart? –  Istrebitel Dec 13 '12 at 13:48
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If you are in an unsafe context you can get a pointer to a blittable type, such as int, the same way you can in C or C++. In your case &bytesread. That said for simple pointer parameters you should always use the ref or out keywords.

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Hmm. I try to pass &bytesread as a parameter to where it expects me to have IntPtr and it complains about being unable to cast int to IntPtr. Am I doing it wrong (I understand I should use ref and i will in end product, but I want to learn how to do this too) –  Istrebitel Dec 14 '12 at 6:44
    
When you use the address operator you get a pointer of the same type as the variable. In this case you have an int*, so you either change your declaration to take an int* or cast it to IntPtr (i.e. (IntPtr)&bytesread) or create new IntPtr(&bytesread). –  Stephen Martin Dec 14 '12 at 13:05
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I think the access violation is because bytesread is managed, therefore the GC may move it, making the pointer you passed invalid.

Does the following work?

int bytesread = 0;
var pin = GCHandle.Alloc(bytesread, GCHandleType.Pinned)
ReadFile(fs.SafeFileHandle.DangerousGetHandle(), (IntPtr)fb, Convert.ToUInt32(mb.Length), pin.AddrOfPinnedObject(), null);

[edit] I forgot the next line:

pin.Free();

[double edit] Oh dear! I got the wrong end of the stick completely. What I'm saying applies more to handling managed data from the heap in safe code.

@plinth is exactly right, the code:

int x = 0;
IntPtr ptrtox = new IntPtr(x)

Creates a pointer with the value of x, not pointing to x. In your original code just pass:

new IntPtr(&bytesread)

or

(IntPtr)(&bytesread)
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Semms to work. So, i must do this for everything i want to pass as IntPtr to the pinvoke method? Do I have to somehow release the "pin"? Can I pass GCHandle.Alloc(myVarName, GCHandleType.Pinned)AddrOfPinnedObject() directly to avoid extra line of code? –  Istrebitel Dec 13 '12 at 13:41
    
I'd stick with the ref declaration if I were you, the function is the same. But yes I forgot to say you need to unpin! So you cant pin, call, unpin in one line. –  Peter Wishart Dec 13 '12 at 13:44
    
Okay, but generally, how do i make a pointer to something, without allocating it like this? Only via "fixed" keyword? –  Istrebitel Dec 13 '12 at 14:28
    
Sorry, yes fixed can be used to pin pointers as well, does the same thing as GCHandle.Alloc / Free I think. For local variables only, you can allocate memory yourself on the stack with stackalloc straight into a pointer, which is unmanaged so doesn't need pinned. –  Peter Wishart Dec 13 '12 at 14:37
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