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I would like to use function polymorphism in my PHP classes. I intend to check the input type of a function for some of my children classes functions.

class A
{
    public function setValue(Type $value)
    {
    }
}

class B extends A
{
    public function setValue(XType $value)
    {
    }
}

class C extends A
{
    public function setValue(ZType $value)
    {
    }
}
$b = new B();
$b->setValue(new XType());

with

class Type {};
class XType extends Type;
class ZType extends Type;

The behavior I am looking for is that PHP throws an exception if setValue is called with the wrong argument type.

If I use the above code, I get an error:

Runtime Notice: Declaration of B::setValue() should be compatible with A::setValue(Type $value) in B.php line ..

This is how I managed to obtain the behavior I wanted:

class B extends A
{
    public function setValue(Type $value)
    {
        if (!$value instanceof XType) {
            throw new \Exception("value $value not allowed, should be of type XType");
        parent::setValue($value);
        }
    }
}

But I would be glad to let the PHP core handle that bit of code for me :)

I see that I was not clear enough..

I am trying to provide the caller with a default behavior, A::setValue(), and with a specific behaviour regarding certain child classes, B::setValue(), so if the caller tries to call B::setValue() with an unsupported type, it will get an error, but if it calls, let's say, D::setValue(), it will get the default, A::setValue().

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5  
Do you have any question? –  eisberg Dec 13 '12 at 13:30
    
Lol, Yes ! I would like to know if there is a way to achieve the same behavior I managed to get without the instanceof part :) –  Mylen Dec 13 '12 at 13:33
    
Method parameter types are contravariant. –  phant0m Dec 13 '12 at 13:36

1 Answer 1

What you have already works, there's no need for the instanceof check you're doing. You can just declare the type in the argument type hint.

What is wrong with your code is that it's not proper polymorphism. That is also what the notice (note: not error) wants to tell you. Your subclasses require a different type of argument than the parent class. Even if those types are related, it means you cannot substitute one of the child classes for any given instance of the parent class. That is what is breaking polymorphism. If your child classes require a more specialized type, their declaration is not compatible with their parent anymore and hence they're not entirely polymorphic.

In proper polymorphism, this should work:

if (rand(0, 1)) {
    $obj = new A;
} else {
    $obj = new B;
}

$obj->setValue(new Type);

With what you're trying to do it would not work.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I see what you mean... I should be more specific about my need, I will edit my question, thank you ! –  Mylen Dec 13 '12 at 13:39
    
I understood what you're trying to do, but there's no real difference in the answer. :) You should not narrow or alter the type a function accepts in its children. I understand that's an easy temptation, but ask yourself why you're doing this. You're explicitly making certain classes depend on certain other classes. That's two inheritance chains being coupled together. If they're that closely related, why aren't they in the same class or otherwise explicitly coupled to begin with? Maybe there's a legitimate use case for this, but think first if that's really needed. –  deceze Dec 13 '12 at 13:50
    
I did not declare the type in the class because the Type is used in different classes.. To let you understand what I am trying to achieve, go have a look at graphviz.org/content/attrs I am trying to map all attributes and attributes types to OO style classes. Attributes represent my classes A, B, C and attributes types the XType, YType, etc. I want to make sure that A is using the proper Type –  Mylen Dec 13 '12 at 14:19
    
Why do you differentiate between "attributes" and "attribute types" as two separate class hierarchies? Seems to me that an attribute is a type. You could have a number of different abstract parent classes which represent types (Double, ArrowType, ...) and have concrete attributes extend those types (Damping extends Double, Arrowtail extends ArrowType). That would seem to model the requirement much better. –  deceze Dec 13 '12 at 14:51
    
I neither thought about it! I will give it a try and let you know if that suits my needs –  Mylen Dec 13 '12 at 15:10

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