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This is my first attempt at getting data back from an API, and getting the data to output to a view.

I want to put an ISBN number into a search form and get the data back for that particular book using http://isbndb.com/. This is what I have so far:

Controller:

require 'open-uri'
class BookController < ApplicationController
  def searchbook
  resp = open("http://isbndb.com/api/books.xml?access_key=#{'API KEY HERE'}&results=texts&index1=isbn&value1=#{params[:isbn]}")
  doc = Nokogiri.XML(resp.read)
  # ... process response here

 end
end

Form:

<%= form_tag({:controller => 'book', :action => 'searchbook'}, {:method => 'get'}) do |select| %>
<%= label_tag :isbn, "Enter ISBN Number" %>
<%= text_field_tag :isbn, params[:isbn] %>
<%= submit_tag "Search" %>
<% end %>

The XML to be returned

  <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
  <ISBNdb server_time="2005-07-29T03:02:22">
  <BookList total_results="1" page_size="10" page_number="1" shown_results="1">
  <BookData book_id="paul_laurence_dunbar" isbn="0766013502">
  <Title>Paul Laurence Dunbar</Title>
  <TitleLong>Paul Laurence Dunbar: portrait of a poet</TitleLong>
  <AuthorsText>Catherine Reef</AuthorsText>
  <PublisherText publisher_id="enslow_publishers">Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, c2000.</PublisherText>
  <Summary>A biography of the poet who faced racism and devoted himself to depicting the black experience in America.</Summary>
  <Notes>"Works by Paul Laurence Dunbar": p. 113-114. Includes bibliographical references (p. 124) and index.</Notes>
  <UrlsText></UrlsText>
  <AwardsText></AwardsText>
  </BookData>
</BookList>
  </ISBNdb>

How do I process an XML request or what can I read to find out how?

Where can I view the data being returned in the console (if any)? I'm not even sure that this is doing anything as yet, however upon clicking "search" in my form I am taken to the searchbook action which is a blank page for now.

I may be a long way off from the whole answer but this is my first time doing this.

share|improve this question
    
Without a sample of the XML you are trying to parse it's difficult to provide you with sample code to use. Parsing XML with Nokogiri is easy, but, again, without sample XML, you'll need to work with Nokogiri's tutorials for parsing. –  the Tin Man Dec 14 '12 at 7:22
    
I have added expected XML, does that help with the question –  Richlewis Dec 14 '12 at 9:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Parsing the XML is easy:

require 'nokogiri'

doc = Nokogiri::XML(<<EOT)
  <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
  <ISBNdb server_time="2005-07-29T03:02:22">
  <BookList total_results="1" page_size="10" page_number="1" shown_results="1">
  <BookData book_id="paul_laurence_dunbar" isbn="0766013502">
  <Title>Paul Laurence Dunbar</Title>
  <TitleLong>Paul Laurence Dunbar: portrait of a poet</TitleLong>
  <AuthorsText>Catherine Reef</AuthorsText>
  <PublisherText publisher_id="enslow_publishers">Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, c2000.</PublisherText>
  <Summary>A biography of the poet who faced racism and devoted himself to depicting the black experience in America.</Summary>
  <Notes>"Works by Paul Laurence Dunbar": p. 113-114. Includes bibliographical references (p. 124) and index.</Notes>
  <UrlsText></UrlsText>
  <AwardsText></AwardsText>
  </BookData>
</BookList>
  </ISBNdb>
EOT

isbn_data = doc.search('BookData').map{ |book_data|

  hash = {}

  %w[ book_id isbn ].each do |p|
    hash[p.downcase.to_sym] = book_data[p]
  end

  %w[ Title TitleLong AuthorsText PublisherText Summary ].each do |t|
    hash[t.downcase.to_sym] = book_data.at(t).text
  end

  hash
}

pp isbn_data

Which outputs:

[{:book_id=>"paul_laurence_dunbar",
  :isbn=>"0766013502",
  :title=>"Paul Laurence Dunbar",
  :titlelong=>"Paul Laurence Dunbar: portrait of a poet",
  :authorstext=>"Catherine Reef",
  :publishertext=>"Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, c2000.",
  :summary=>
   "A biography of the poet who faced racism and devoted himself to depicting the black experience in America."}]

This code was based on the idea you might be receiving multiple <BookData> blocks, so it returns an array of hashes. If you'll only have one use:

hash = {}
book_data = doc.at('BookData')

%w[ book_id isbn ].each do |p|
  hash[p.downcase.to_sym] = book_data[p]
end

%w[ Title TitleLong AuthorsText PublisherText Summary ].each do |t|
  hash[t.downcase.to_sym] = book_data.at(t).text
end

pp hash

The output now looks like:

{:book_id=>"paul_laurence_dunbar",
 :isbn=>"0766013502",
 :title=>"Paul Laurence Dunbar",
 :titlelong=>"Paul Laurence Dunbar: portrait of a poet",
 :authorstext=>"Catherine Reef",
 :publishertext=>"Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, c2000.",
 :summary=>
  "A biography of the poet who faced racism and devoted himself to depicting the black experience in America."}
share|improve this answer

I highly recommend simplifying your controller by moving the ISBNdb-related code to its own model. One good way to do this is via HTTParty:

class ISBNdb
  include HTTParty

  base_uri "http://isbndb.com/api"
  @key = "API_KEY_HERE"

  def self.get_book(isbn)
    params = {'value1' => isbn, 'results' => 'texts', 'index1' => 'isbn', 'access_key' => @key}
    get('/books.xml', :query => params)['ISBNdb']['BookList']['BookData']
  end
end

Then, in your controller, you can use it like this:

book = ISBNdb.get_book('1934356166')
puts book['Title'] #=> "Agile Web Development with Rails"

As you can see, HTTParty parses the response for you, so you access it like a hash.

This solution keeps your controller simple, and also provides a convenient place to add methods for other API calls, should you need additional functionality. This is the Single Responsibility Principle in practice.

share|improve this answer

As you are looking for basic pointing in the right direction, here are a few points I recognized.

1) For fetching any source via HTTP it's common to use an HTTP Client gem. I can recommend Excon and the undervalued HTTP Client gem, though you'll find many more options e.g. in the Ruby Toolbox.

2) To get an insight into the API response you could e.g. just raise an exception outputting the result. I learned this technique from a RailsCast.

# Example with Curb
http = Curl.get("http://www.google.com/")
body = http.body_str

# Raise an exception displaying the value you want to see
raise body.inspect
# or in nicely structured yaml format
raise body.to_yaml

You can use this technique everywhere, for me it comes in handy when you want to have a look at the params you just sent to a certain controller action and more.

A way to even interact with the return value (e.g. try some method calls) might come through the recent better_errors gem. It ships with a console that always you to interact with the current environment through the browser.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, so without a HTTP Client Gem i cannot carry out a call to an api or receive a response? –  Richlewis Dec 13 '12 at 14:04
    
Can I not use open-uri for now as it ships with rails? –  Richlewis Dec 13 '12 at 15:01
    
OpenURI is part of the Ruby Standard Library and thus ships with Ruby directly instead of Rails. It certainly works, but you are looking to improve your code. I'd consider a dedicated HTTP Client a good investment in choosing. Have you had some progress yet with inspecting the HTTP response or the parsed Nokogiri XML object? –  Thomas Klemm Dec 13 '12 at 15:24
    
nothing yet, Im still trying to get my head around the whole process, if someone could explain it like they would too a child I might understand, the documentation i read is very high spec and to be honest it needs dumbing down so i can understand it.. the HTTP response example you gave, that goes in a controller? would you mind expanding on that part please? all help much appreciated –  Richlewis Dec 13 '12 at 15:44
1  
Why is OpenURI not a dedicated HTTP client, but Curb/Curl is? OpenURI is perfectly adequate for normal uses, especially when retrieving data to be parsed. –  the Tin Man Dec 14 '12 at 7:19

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