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I need to catch exceptions thrown by next(it) so I can't use a regular for loop in this case. So I wrote this code:

it = iter(xrange(5))
while True:
    try:
        num = it.next()
        print(num)
    except Exception as e:
        print(e) # log and ignore
    except StopIteration:
        break
print('finished')

This doesn't work, after the numbers are exhausted I get an infinite loop. What am I doing wrong?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It turns out StopIteration is actually a subclass of Exception, not just another throwable class. So the StopIteration handler was never called since StopIteration is alrady handled by the one for Exception. I just had to put the StopIteration handler on top:

it = iter(xrange(5))
while True:
    try:
        num = it.next()
        print(num)
    except StopIteration:
        break
    except Exception as e:
        print(e) # log and ignore
print('finished')
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1  
Of course, the best answer is not to catch Exception, instead only catching specific ones. –  Lattyware Dec 13 '12 at 13:59
    
In general I agree of course, but in this case catching Exception was the right thing to do. (I have to do a large number of independent calculations which takes a couple of days. So I just log which ones fail; later I can fix the bug that caused this and recalculate only what's needed.) –  Erik Dec 14 '12 at 13:54
    
Fair enough - there are always specific cases where it is the right call. –  Lattyware Dec 14 '12 at 15:08
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