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I have a situation where two essentially identical data templates behave completely differently regarding the way they resolve implicit style resources. The inconsistency is making it difficult to handle application wide style resources in a large application I am working on.

The Scenario.

I have a ResourceDictionary in a standalone xaml file called AppStyles.xaml. It defines an implicit style for both the Button and TextBlock classes.

<!-- AppStyles.xaml -->
<ResourceDictionary xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
                    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">

    <Style TargetType="TextBlock" BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type TextBlock}}">
        <Setter Property="Padding" Value="10"/>
        <Setter Property="Background" Value="Red"/>
    </Style>

    <Style TargetType="Button" BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type Button}}">
        <Setter Property="Width" Value="300"/>
    </Style>

</ResourceDictionary>

My MainWindow.xaml file merges AppStyles.xaml into its own Resources. MainWindow.xaml contains two ContentPresenters each of which is bound to a simple viewmodel class. The data template used by the first ContentPresenter is a UserControl declared inline in MainWindow.xaml, the data template used by the second ContentPresenter is also declared inline but references a UserControl defined in a separate file. The actual declaration of the UserControl used by both data templates is otherwise identical.

<!-- MainWindow.xaml -->
<Window x:Class="Demo2.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:Demo2"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525"
        x:Name="_this">

    <Window.Resources>
        <ResourceDictionary>

            <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
                <ResourceDictionary Source="/AppStyles.xaml"/>
            </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>

            <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:TemplateVm1}">
                <UserControl>
                    <StackPanel>
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding TextBlockValue}"/>
                        <Button Content="{Binding ButtonValue}"/>
                    </StackPanel>
                </UserControl>
            </DataTemplate>

            <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:TemplateVm2}">
                <local:UserControl1/>
            </DataTemplate>

        </ResourceDictionary>
    </Window.Resources>


    <StackPanel>

        <ContentPresenter Content="{Binding ElementName=_this, Path=TemplateVm1}"/>

        <ContentPresenter Content="{Binding ElementName=_this, Path=TemplateVm2}"/>

    </StackPanel>
</Window>

The Problem.

The problem is that the two ContentPresenters are rendered completely differently! Both ContentPresenters render the Button using the style from AppStyles.xaml, but whereas the first ContentPresenter does not apply the implicit TextBlock style, the second one does.

My expectation was that the TextBlock style would not be applied to the template displayed by either ContentPresenter due to the WPF behaviour whereby only components derived from Control look outside the current template to resolve resources, (and the TextBlock does not derive from Control).

So what is going on here, and how can I get it to behave consistently?

For completeness of the example here are the implementations of the viewmodels and the MainWindow code behind and the UserControl used in the second template.

// TemplateVm.cs
namespace Demo2
{
    public class TemplateVm1
    {
        public TemplateVm1()
        {
            TextBlockValue = "TextBlock in ContentPresenter1.";
            ButtonValue = "Button in ContentPresenter1";
        }

        public string TextBlockValue { get; private set; }
        public string ButtonValue { get; private set; }
    }

    public class TemplateVm2
    {
        public TemplateVm2()
        {
            TextBlockValue = "TextBlock in ContentPresenter2.";
            ButtonValue = "Button in ContentPresenter2";
        }

        public string TextBlockValue { get; private set; }
        public string ButtonValue { get; private set; }
    }
}
// MainWindow.xaml.cs
namespace Demo2
{
    using System.Windows;

    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            TemplateVm1 = new TemplateVm1();
            TemplateVm2 = new TemplateVm2();
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        public TemplateVm1 TemplateVm1 { get; private set; }
        public TemplateVm2 TemplateVm2 { get; private set; }
    }
}
<!-- UserControl1.xaml -->
<UserControl x:Class="Demo2.UserControl1"
             xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
             xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
             xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
             mc:Ignorable="d" d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="300">

    <StackPanel>
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding TextBlockValue}"/>
        <Button Content="{Binding ButtonValue}"/>
    </StackPanel>

</UserControl>
share|improve this question
    
Well i'm also a bit baffled why this is happening, but you should get a consistent behavior when you merge your AppStyles into the app.xaml. If that doesn't work one way would be to merge the xaml in the UserControl, but i strongly advise against that solution. Are you really sure that one style is used and the other isn't can you confirm that with more meaningfull properties like setting a background color? –  dowhilefor Dec 13 '12 at 14:16
    
Resources merged into App.xaml are applied differently to those merged elsewhere in that whatever is merged into App.xaml applies to absolutely everything. So yes I can put AppStyles.xaml into App.xaml and then the TextBlock style is applied to both templates. But because of the difference in the way App.xaml resources are applied the TextBlock style would then also be applied within the Buttons too (because they have TextBlocks in their default ControlTemplates), which is most undesirable because I only want my application styles to apply to application declared controls. –  Neutrino Dec 13 '12 at 15:09
    
I'm quite certain that in the case of the first template the style for the Button is applied while the style for the TextBlock is not applied. I have tested it with both Width and Background properties. In the case of the second template both the Button and the TextBlock are applied. –  Neutrino Dec 13 '12 at 15:09

1 Answer 1

If I remember correctly, WPF considers ControlTemplates to be a boundry, and will not apply implicit styles inside of templates.

But there is one exception to this rule: anything that inherits from Control will apply implicit styles.

Since a Button inherits from Control, it applies the implicit style. But a TextBlock inherits from FrameworkElement, not Control, so it doesn't apply the implicit style automatically and you have to add it manually.

You should find that if you switch your TextBlock to a Label, the implicit style will get applied since Label inherits from Control

As another alternative, I think you can apply the implicit TextBlock style manually by creating another implicit TextBlock style inside your UserControl.Resources

<Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBlock}" BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type FrameworkElement}}" />
share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what I thought too, but that doesn't answer the question of why is the implicit TextBlock style getting applied to one template but not the other? In the first template which does not apply the TextBlock style I can manually redefine the style which does indeed cause it to become applied. But redefining the style wherever it needs to be applied is error prone and somewhat defeats the point of the application defining all its styles in a single reusable file. –  Neutrino Dec 13 '12 at 15:10
    
However the suggestion that I could just use a Label instead is a good idea which might work out nicely. Perhaps that is the way these two controls are intended to be used, Labels as client application top level UI controls and TextBlocks primarily as subcomponents of custom controls that should not have application level styling applied to them. Hey Ho, another day, another undocumented WPF nuance learned :) –  Neutrino Dec 13 '12 at 15:10

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