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I was reading a post about MongoDB and CouchDB and saw that MongoDB could lose data but CouchDB is somehow stable and its not possible to lose any data.

Redis and mongodb users might be somewhat surprised to learn that, by default, they can lose your data should the process crash or shut down.

http://java.dzone.com/articles/should-i-use-mongodb-couchdb

There is a way to solve this problem in MongoDB, but did I get it correctly: CouchDB is more durable and stable without any configuration? So if the CouchDB is crashing or lets say a bomb would explode during an update process on the CouchDB system => there is never a datalost?

I just would like to know why. Is it because CouchDB is written in Erlang? Or is it because CouchDB is using MVCC? Any ideas? Thank you

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closed as not constructive by Remon van Vliet, Sammaye, Sergio Tulentsev, EdChum, Frank van Puffelen Dec 13 '12 at 18:35

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Technically there is a 60ms window on MongoDB by which, due to journal write times etc you could lose your data, but most of this seems like some one trying to fight the war of which is better... –  Sammaye Dec 13 '12 at 14:30
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That's exactly right. Due to CouchDB patented quantum bubble teleport technology CouchDB never loses data even during the explosion of a bomb (nuclear or otherwise) on or near the servers whereas MongoDB fails to do any warping of the fabric of space-time whatsoever and loses its data in such an event. Have a close vote. –  Remon van Vliet Dec 13 '12 at 14:41
    
The article does not cite any sources for the claim that "MongoDB loses data" or even mentions under what scenarios it is supposed to do that, so I would file it under FUD. –  Philipp Dec 13 '12 at 14:54
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2 Answers

There is a way to solve this problem in MongoDB, but did I get it correctly: CouchDB is more durable and stable without any configuration? So if the CouchDB is crashing or lets say a bomb would explode during an update process on the CouchDB system => there is never a datalost?

I am unsure about CouchDBs specifics, however a quick Google search shows that, by default CouchDB is actually eventually consistent ( http://guide.couchdb.org/draft/consistency.html , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eventual_consistency ) where as MongoDB is described as having a strong consistency. Non-ACID techs (including MongoDB) do not have most properties which ensures full durability of data by, i.e. writing straight to disk and immediate replication.

You have got to remember however that MongoDB can lose data since it doesn't write directly to disk (which is what makes techs like MySQL "slow", though technically SQL techs can also lose data due to how disk writes are performed; you can't write to a disk that isn't powered) but the window is like 60ms or something for the potential loss under a complete fail scenario, and if you send the command to multiple nodes the chance of that 60ms window occuring, in the same data center, becomes rather remote so MongoDB isn't like writing to /dev/null.

So CouchDB never loses data? no, it can.

Basically the link you stated seems a bit biased to me and it doesn't take into account what eventual consistency actually is, maybe it was written by the same guy on this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2F-DItXtZs

Edit

I can blow up your server for you if you wanna test this.

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+1 for the edit! –  Remon van Vliet Dec 14 '12 at 13:10
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MongoDB is designed to be set up in a replica set of at least two nodes. Running a single node should only be done in a development environment.

When you have a replica set and one of the nodes crashes, the other node(s) will keep recording all data changes. When the crashed node comes back up, the nodes will synchronize automatically. The crashed node will receive all missed changes from the other(s), including those it wasn't able to write to disk before it crashed.

When you set up a replica set of multiple nodes which run on different physical servers, MongoDB becomes very durable.

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