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HMODULE m_LangDll;  

wchar_t* GetString(const int StringID)
{
    wchar_t* nn = {0};
    if (m_LangDll)
    {
        wchar_t temp[2048];
        if(::LoadString(m_LangDll, StringID, temp, 2048))
        {
            MessageBox(0, L"string found", 0, 0);
            nn = temp;
            return nn;
        }
    }

    //assert(s.length() && _T("String not found!"));
    return 0;
}

This code works perfectly fine. It returns the string I want no problem.

If I remove the MessageBox(0, L"String Not Found", 0, 0) it dosn't. It returns a random character. Im obviously doing something wrong. I just dont understand how a seemingly un-related call to MessageBox(0,0,0,0) has any influence.

I have tried replacing the MessageBox call with other code. Like allocating more wchar_t* but it seems it has something to do with calling MessageBox.

I have been calling GetString like...

MessageBox(0, GetString(101),L"HHHHH", 0);

and I get a different bunch of jibberish when i call it like...

wchar_t* tempString = GetString(101);
MessageBox(0, tempString, 0, 0);

but both of these ways work as long as i don't comment out MessageBox() in GetString

[EDIT]

Thanks for your replies they were all really helpfull.

my code is now

wchar_t* GetString(const int StringID)
{
    wchar_t* nn = new wchar_t[2048];
    if (m_LangDll)
    {
        if(::LoadString(m_LangDll, StringID, nn, 2048))
        {       
        return nn;
        }
    }
    delete [] nn;
    //assert(s.length() && _T("String not found!"));
    return 0;
}

thanks neagoegab especially.

Just one more question. Why would it be that MessageBox() made the code work?

share|improve this question
    
temp is on stack... it will be deleted... at } –  neagoegab Dec 13 '12 at 14:51
    
in this expression nn = {0}; -> you should use std::nullptr instead of this. –  neagoegab Dec 13 '12 at 14:58
    
It is just by chance as the code was ill-formed. Undefined behaviour means anything can happen. –  hmjd Dec 13 '12 at 17:16

3 Answers 3

You are returning the address of a local variable from a function, causing undefined behaviour:

nn = temp; // when the function returns temp is out of scope
return nn; // and n is pointing at temp.

Return a std::wstring instead and use c_str() to access the const wchar_t* representation.

share|improve this answer

Perhaps, a problem is that GetString() returns a pointer to buffer llocated on the stack ('temp' local variable). Technically, the buffer is invalid after the return

share|improve this answer

Your temp variable is on stack... alocate it on heap:

HMODULE m_LangDll;  

wchar_t* GetString(const int StringID)
{
    wchar_t* nn = new wchar_t[2048];
    if (m_LangDll)
    {
        if(::LoadString(m_LangDll, StringID, nn, 2048))
        {
            MessageBox(0, L"string found", 0, 0);
            nn = temp;
            return nn;
        }
    }

    delete [] nn;
    //assert(s.length() && _T("String not found!"));
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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