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I want to allow the two main wildcards ? and * to filter my data.

Here is how I'm doing now (as I saw on many websites):

public boolean contains(String data, String filter) {
    if(data == null || data.isEmpty()) {
        return false;
    }
    String regex = filter.replace(".", "[.]")
                         .replace("?", ".")
                         .replace("*", ".*");
    return Pattern.matches(regex, data);
}

But shouldn't we escape all the other regex special chars, like | or (, etc.? And also, maybe we could preserve ? and * if they are preceded by a \? For example, something like:

filter.replaceAll("([$|\\[\\]{}(),.+^-])", "\\\\$1") // 1. escape regex special chars, but ?, * and \
      .replaceAll("([^\\\\]|^)\\?", "$1.")           // 2. replace any ? that isn't preceded by a \ by .
      .replaceAll("([^\\\\]|^)\\*", "$1.*")          // 3. replace any * that isn't preceded by a \ by .*
      .replaceAll("\\\\([^?*]|$)", "\\\\\\\\$1");    // 4. replace any \ that isn't followed by a ? or a * (possibly due to step 2 and 3) by \\

What do you think about it? If you agree, am I missing any other regex special char?


Edit #1 (after having taken into account dan1111's and m.buettner's advices):

// replace any even number of backslashes by a *
regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)(\\\\\\\\)+(?!\\\\)", "*");
// reduce redundant wildcards that aren't preceded by a \
regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[?]*[*][*?]+", "*");
// escape regexps special chars, but \, ? and *
regex = regex.replaceAll("([|\\[\\]{}(),.^$+-])", "\\\\$1");
// replace ? that aren't preceded by a \ by .
regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[?]", ".");
// replace * that aren't preceded by a \ by .*
regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[*]", ".*");

What about this one?


Edit #2 (after having taken into account dan1111's advices):

// replace any even number of backslashes by a *
regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)(\\\\\\\\)+(?!\\\\)", "*");
// reduce redundant wildcards that aren't preceded by a \
regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[?]*[*][*?]+", "*");
// escape regexps special chars (if not already escaped by user), but \, ? and *
regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)([|\\[\\]{}(),.^$+-])", "\\\\$1");
// replace ? that aren't preceded by a \ by .
regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[?]", ".");
// replace * that aren't preceded by a \ by .*
regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[*]", ".*");

Goal in sight?

share|improve this question
8  
If this is going to be on a public website, someone could use it to attack your site. They could create a regex that will never match, and is constructed to have a huge amount of possibilities so that it will take forever to run. Then they could use that to swamp your server. – dan1111 Dec 13 '12 at 15:19
    
Indeed, dan1111 is correct. For further reading, check out en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ReDoS . – Mansoor Siddiqui Dec 13 '12 at 15:25
    
@dan1111 Which piece of code are you talking about? I agree with you if you were talking about the first one, since the user will be able to write his own regex within the filter. But the idea of the second one is precisely to forbid any regex special char, and to allow only the ? and * wildcards. – sp00m Dec 14 '12 at 9:54
    
@sp00m, even if you allow only . and *, this attack is possible. See m.buettner's answer for an example of that. Basically, multiple .* patterns next to each other create a huge number of match possibilities, because there are so many ways to break down the string into matching groups. .*.* can match abcd in five different ways: ('','abcd'), ('a','bcd') and so on. And this increases exponentially as more .*'s are added. The regex engine will try all the possibilities until it finds a match. – dan1111 Dec 14 '12 at 10:12
    
@dan1111 You're right, I tried to take this point into account in the edit I made of my question. What do you think about it now? – sp00m Dec 14 '12 at 11:14

You don't need 4 backslashes in the replacement string to write out a single one. Two backslashes are enough.

And you can avoid the ([^\\\\]|^) and the $1 in the replacement string by using a negative lookbehind:

filter.replaceAll("([$|\\[\\]{}(),.+^-])", "\\$1") // 1. escape regex special chars, but ?, * and \
      .replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[?]", ".")           // 2. replace any ? that isn't preceded by a \ by .
      .replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[*]", ".*")          // 3. replace any * that isn't preceded by a \ by .*

I don't really see what you need the last step for. Wouldn't that escape the backslashes that escape your meta-characters (in turn, actually not escaping them). I'm ignoring the fact that your replacement call would have written out 4 backslashes instead of only two. But say your original input had th|is. Then your first replacement would make that th\|is. Then the last replacement would make that th\\|is which matches either th-backslash or is.

You need to differentiate between how your string looks written in code (uncompiled, with twice as many backslashes) and how it looks after it was compiled (containing only half the amount of backslashes).

You might also want to think about restricting the number of possible *. A regex like .*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*! (where ! can not be found in the input) can take quite a while to run. The issue is called catastrophic backtracking.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks for your advices. I edited my question, what do you think about it yet? – sp00m Dec 14 '12 at 11:15
    
Side note: I do need a \\\\$1 in my replacement string. Otherwise, $1 won't be taken as a reference to the first group of the regex. – sp00m Dec 14 '12 at 11:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is finally the solution I adopted (using the Apache Commons Lang library):

public static boolean isFiltered(String data, String filter) {
    // no filter: return true
    if (StringUtils.isBlank(filter)) {
        return true;
    }
    // a filter but no data: return false
    else if (StringUtils.isBlank(data)) {
        return false;
    }
    // a filter and a data:
    else {
        // case insensitive
        data = data.toLowerCase();
        filter = filter.toLowerCase();
        // .matches() auto-anchors, so add [*] (i.e. "containing")
        String regex = "*" + filter + "*";
        // replace any pair of backslashes by [*]
        regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)(\\\\\\\\)+(?!\\\\)", "*");
        // minimize unescaped redundant wildcards
        regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[?]*[*][*?]+", "*");
        // escape unescaped regexps special chars, but [\], [?] and [*]
        regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)([|\\[\\]{}(),.^$+-])", "\\\\$1");
        // replace unescaped [?] by [.]
        regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[?]", ".");
        // replace unescaped [*] by [.*]
        regex = regex.replaceAll("(?<!\\\\)[*]", ".*");
        // return whether data matches regex or not
        return data.matches(regex);
    }
}

Many thanks to @dan1111 and @m.buettner for their precious help ;)

share|improve this answer

Try this simpler version:

String regex = Pattern.quote(filter).replace("*", "\\E.*\\Q").replace("?", "\\E.\\Q");

This quotes the whole filter with \Q and \E, and then stops the quoting on * and ?, replacing them with their pattern equivalent (.* and .)

I tested it with

String simplePattern = "ab*g\\Ei\\.lmn?p";
String data = "abcdefg\\Ei\\.lmnop";
String quotedPattern = Pattern.quote(simplePattern);
System.out.println(quotedPattern);
String regex = quotedPattern.replace("*", "\\E.*\\Q").replace("?", "\\E.\\Q");
System.out.println(regex);
System.out.println(data.matches(regex));

Output:

\Qab*g\E\\E\Qi\.lmn?p\E
\Qab\E.*\Qg\E\\E\Qi\.lmn\E.\Qp\E
true

Notice this is based on Oracle's implementation of Pattern.quote, I don't know if there are other valid implementations.

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