Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following NUnit test class:

[TestFixture]
public class Tests
{
    async Task<string> GetMessageAsync()
    {
        return "Hello from GetMessageAsync!";
    }

    Task<string> GetMessageTask()
    {
        return new Task<string>(() => "Hello from GetMessageTask!");
    }

    [Test]
    public async void AwaitAsyncMethod()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("Hello from GetMessageAsync!", await GetMessageAsync());
    }

    [Test]
    public async void AwaitTaskMethod()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual("Hello from GetMessageTask!", await GetMessageTask());
    }
}

The first test, AwaitAsyncMethod(), completes successfully immediately upon execution. The second test, AwaitTaskMethod(), never completes. But it does compile.

Why does the second test never complete? Why can I compile an await against a non-async method, if seemingly it doesn't actually work? Let's say for some reason I want a non-async method to return a task that can be awaited - how do I change this code to accomplish that?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

new Task(...) returns an unstarted Task.
Until you call Start(), that task will never finish, and anything waiting for it will never run.

Instead, you can call Task.Run(), which will create and start a task for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Aha. Task.Run is what I was missing. Thanks. –  RationalGeek Dec 13 '12 at 15:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.