Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Trying to efficiently extract some numbers from a string and have tried

  • java.util.regex.Matcher
  • com.google.common.base.Splitter

The results were :

  • via Regular Expression: 24417 ms
  • via Google Splitter: 17730 ms

Is there another faster way you can recommend ?

I know similar questions asked before e.g. How to extract multiple integers from a String in Java? but my emphasis is on making this fast (but maintainable/simple) as it happens a lot.


EDIT : Here are my final results which tie in with those from Andrea Ligios below:

  • Regular Expression (without brackets) : 18857
  • Google Splitter (without the superflous trimResults() method): 15329
  • Martijn Courteaux answer below: 4073

import org.junit.Test;

import com.google.common.base.CharMatcher;
import com.google.common.base.Splitter;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

public class Sample {

    final static int COUNT = 50000000;
    public static final String INPUT = "FOO-1-9-BAR1"; // I want 1, 9, 1

    @Test
    public void extractNumbers() {
        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < COUNT; i++) {
            // Output is list of 1, 9, 1
            Demo.extractNumbersViaGoogleSplitter(INPUT);
        }
        System.out.println("Total execution time (ms) via Google Splitter: " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime));


        startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int i = 0; i < COUNT; i++) {
            // Output is list of 1, 9, 1
            Demo.extractNumbersViaRegEx(INPUT);
        }
        System.out.println("Total execution time (ms) Regular Expression: " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime));

    }
}

class Demo {

    static List<Integer> extractNumbersViaGoogleSplitter(final String text) {

        Iterator<String> iter = Splitter.on(CharMatcher.JAVA_DIGIT.negate()).trimResults().omitEmptyStrings().split(text).iterator();
        final List<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        while (iter.hasNext()) {
            result.add(Integer.parseInt(iter.next()));

        }
        return result;
    }
    /**
     * Matches all the numbers in a string, as individual groups. e.g.
     * FOO-1-BAR1-1-12 matches 1,1,1,12.
     */
    private static final Pattern NUMBERS = Pattern.compile("(\\d+)");

    static List<Integer> extractNumbersViaRegEx(final String source) {
        final Matcher matcher = NUMBERS.matcher(source);
        final List<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();

        if (matcher.find()) {
            do {
                result.add(Integer.parseInt(matcher.group(0)));
            } while (matcher.find());
            return result;
        }
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this question
4  
Just out of curiosity, does your measurement for the regex approach change if you remove the parentheses from the pattern? –  m.buettner Dec 13 '12 at 15:36
4  
Your benchmarking test is flawed. You are doing one test after the other. The second test will have the benefit of the JVM being warmed up already. Run each test in its own JVM invocation. –  Steve Kuo Dec 13 '12 at 15:46
1  
Use google caliper for benchmarking –  durron597 Dec 13 '12 at 15:51
1  
m.buettner, I have tested now with Pattern.compile("\\d+") and it has gone from 24s to 18s. According to JProfiler, NUMBERS.matcher is indeed a hotspot –  k1eran Dec 13 '12 at 16:00
2  
@k1eran see what a difference capturing makes ;). never use parentheses unless you have to. and if you have to, use (?: ... ) instead of plain parentheses, unless you actually need to backreference or capture something. –  m.buettner Dec 13 '12 at 16:21
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is a very quick algorithm:

public List<Integer> extractIntegers(String input)
{
    List<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    int index = 0;
    int v = 0;
    int l = 0;
    while (index < input.length())
    {
        char c = input.charAt(index);
        if (Character.isDigit(c))
        {
            v *= 10;
            v += c - '0';
            l++;
        } else if (l > 0)
        {
            result.add(v);
            l = 0;
            v = 0;
        }
        index++;
    }
    if (l > 0)
    {
        result.add(v);
    }
    return result;
}

This code took on my machine 3672 milliseconds, for "FOO-1-9-BAR1" and 50000000 runs. I'm on a 2.3 GHz core.

share|improve this answer
    
What's up with the clever char hack ;-) –  Eddie B Dec 14 '12 at 4:37
add comment

EDIT: for the sake of the knowledge, i've run the different solutions on the same (old) machine, with 5000000 iterations (one zero removed from OP question), here are the results:

Total execution time (ms) via Martijn Courteaux algorithm: 2562

Total execution time (ms) via Char comparison: 6891

Total execution time (ms) Regular Expression (WITH parenthesis): 12937

Total execution time (ms) Regular Expression (WITHOUT parenthesis): 12297


This is circa two time faster than regex:

   startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
   for (int i = 0; i < COUNT; i++) {
       // Output is list of 1, 9, 1
       Demo.extractNumbersViaCharComparison(INPUT);
   }
   System.out.println("Total execution time (ms) via Char comparison: " + 
                              (System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime));

[...]

    static List<Integer> extractNumbersViaCharComparison(final String text) {

        final List<Integer> result = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        char[] chars = text.toCharArray();

        StringBuilder sB = new StringBuilder();
        boolean previousWasDigit = false;
        for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {
            if (Character.isDigit(chars[i])){
                previousWasDigit = true;
                sB.append(chars[i]);
            } else {
                if (previousWasDigit){
                    result.add(Integer.valueOf(sB.toString()));                 
                    previousWasDigit = false;
                    sB = new StringBuilder();
                }                   
            }
        }
        if (previousWasDigit)
            result.add(Integer.valueOf(sB.toString()));

        return result;
    }

By the way the other solution is a lot more elegant, +1

share|improve this answer
    
-1: Your algorithm doesn't work for input where it has to extract numbers > 9, eg: FOO-23-BAR98 should result in 23 and 98, but your code will return 2, 3, 9, 8. –  Martijn Courteaux Dec 13 '12 at 15:54
    
you're right, i've edited for completeness but your solution is definitely the sweetest (and fastest) one –  Andrea Ligios Dec 13 '12 at 16:23
    
-1 removed :) Allocating StringBuilders in a loop looks very inefficient. –  Martijn Courteaux Dec 13 '12 at 16:29
    
Only when a (n-long) number ends... what would you suggest instead? –  Andrea Ligios Dec 13 '12 at 16:37
    
Look at my code :) –  Martijn Courteaux Dec 13 '12 at 18:29
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.