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I have the following questions regarding pthread of posix.

  • When we receive data in pthread_join() returned by the function being executed by a thread, we type cast the variable like (void **) even though the variable is a single pointer.

    int *x;
    
    pthread_join(tid,(void**)&x);
    
    printf("%d",*x);
    
  • Should I derefrence the type casted argument (in case of structure)? Why can't I do like struct Data *obj= & (struct Data*)arg;?

    int main()
    {
     ...
     pthread_create(tid,NULL,Foo,&obj);
     ...
    }
    void *Foo(void *arg)
    {
        struct Data *obj=* (struct Data*)arg;
    }
    
  • How does pthread_join() internally receives the returned variable.

Regards

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of, you should never do (void**)&x as pointers off different types need not be of the same size.

Now, some scenarios (some valid, some working but invalid and some just broken):

Foo() returning a pointer to an int (valid):

void* Foo(void *arg)
{
    int *ret = malloc(sizeof(int));
    *ret = 42;
    return ret;
}

void *ptr;
int *x;
pthread_join(thread, &ptr);
x = ptr;
printf("%d", *x);
free(x);

Foo() returning an int (invalid but usually work):
Platforms where int is larger than a pointer this will not work.

void* Foo(void *arg)
{
   return 42;
}

void *ptr;
int x;
pthread_join(thread, &ptr);
printf("%d", (int)ptr);

Foo() returning a pointer to static int (invalid and never works): All static memory in Foo() is freed when Foo() returns, before pthread_join() can copy the value.

void* Foo(void *arg)
{
   int ret = 42;
   return &ret;
}

void *ptr;
int *x;
pthread_join(thread, &ptr);
x = ptr;
printf("%d", *x);
share|improve this answer

You shouldn't do that: at your level of understanding of C casts should be simply forbidden. If you learned that in a course, this is not really high quality.

First of all, &x is the address of a pointer so the result is int**, so well two indirections.

But casting that int away is dangerous, pointers to int and void don't have necessarily the same width on different platforms. So please do

void*x;
pthread_join(tid, &x);

printf("%d",*(int*)x);
share|improve this answer
    
But doesn't pthread_join takes a double pointer void variable? Or passing a single pointer void variable is valid – Alfred Dec 13 '12 at 16:03
    
Since when is the width of a pointer-to-void and pointer-to-anything-else platform-dependent and not defined by the standard? Is there a standard-compliant platform where sizeof(<type>*) and sizeof(void*) are exceptional in the case where <type> happens to be a pointer-to-int (or any other pointer type as far as that goes)? Or did you intend to reflect an alignment issue instead? – WhozCraig Dec 13 '12 at 16:38
    
size(void*) >= sizeof(<type>*) is what the standard says as far as I remember. But you will probably have to look in a museum for any platform using different sizes for different pointer types. – Joel Klinghed Dec 13 '12 at 16:41
    
@Alfred, I am not sure that I understand your question. if x is a void* then &x is a void**. – Jens Gustedt Dec 13 '12 at 16:53
    
@JoelKlinghed, I don't think that the standard foresees any kind of relation between the sizes. The only thing it enforces is that sizeof(void*) and sizeof(char*) (etc) are the same, and even that their representation be the same. On architectures with segmented memory pointers can be realized differently for different base types. – Jens Gustedt Dec 13 '12 at 16:58

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