Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a n00b to Python and am attempting to bring the little bit of knowledge I have from shell and PHP scripting to Python. I really trying to grasp the concepts of creating and manipulating the values within (while keeping the code in an understandable form).

I am having trouble utilizing the Python implementations of LISTS and MAPPINGS ( dict() ). I am writing a script that needs to use an associative array (a python mapping) inside of a basic array (a Python list). The list can use the typical INT index.

Thanks!

Here is what I have currently:

'''  Marrying old-school array concepts
[in Python verbiage] a list (arr1) of mappings (arr2)
[per my old-school training] a 2D array with 
        arr1 using an INT index
        arr2 using an associative index
'''
arr1 = []
arr1[0] = dict([    ('ticker'," "),
                        ('t_date'," "),
                        ('t_open'," "),
                        ('t_high'," "),
                        ('t_low'," "),
                        ('t_close'," "),
                        ('t_volume'," ")
                        ] )
arr1[1] = dict([    ('ticker'," "),
                        ('t_date'," "),
                        ('t_open'," "),
                        ('t_high'," "),
                        ('t_low'," "),
                        ('t_close'," "),
                        ('t_volume'," ")
                        ] )

arr1[0]['t_volume'] = 11250000
arr1[1]['t_volume'] = 11260000

print "\nAssociative array inside of an INT indexed array:"
print arr1[0]['t_volume'], arr1[1]['t_volume']

In PHP, I have the following example working:

'''
arr_desired[0] = array( 'ticker'        => 'ibm'
                            't_date'        => '1/1/2008'
                            't_open'        => 123.20
                            't_high'        => 123.20
                            't_low'     => 123.20
                            't_close'   => 123.20
                            't_volume'  => 11250000
                        );
arr_desired[1] = array( 'ticker'        => 'ibm'
                            't_date'        => '1/2/2008'
                            't_open'        => 124.20
                            't_high'        => 124.20
                            't_low'     => 124.20
                            't_close'   => 124.20
                            't_volume'  => 11260000
                        );

print arr_desired[0]['t_volume'],arr_desired[1]['t_volume'] # should print>>> 11250000 11260000
'''
share|improve this question
1  
if you already know some programming language; give python tutorial a try –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 13 '12 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your list and dict literal definitions can be much simplified:

keys = ['ticker', 't_date', 't_open', 't_high', 't_low', 't_close', 't_volume']
arr1 = [
    dict.fromkeys(keys, ' '),
    dict.fromkeys(keys, ' ')
]

I'm using the dict.fromkeys() method to initialize a dict with a sequence of keys, all with a given default value (a one-space string).

When you define an empty list in Python, you cannot simply address elements that don't exist. Alternatively, use the .append() method to add new elements to a list:

arr1.append({'key': 'value', 'otherkey': 'othervalue'})

The above example uses the {k: v} dict literal notation.

I suspect you would benefit from reading the (excellent) Python tutorial first.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! <pre><code>The dict.fromkeys(keys,' ')</code></pre> logic works well, along with the append() logic. Yes, I was using the tutorial and got but so far before having to ask my question. From what I can tell, the tutorial is very good. However, it can only get a person so far (i.e. - your logic is not covered). Again, thanks much! –  Dr.EMG Dec 13 '12 at 18:29

Here is what I learned, for those coming from a similar programming background as mine:

arr0 = dict( [ ('one',1), ('two',2), ('three',3) ] )
for k,v in arr0.iteritems() : 
    print k,v           #prints the associative array key with the value

keys = ['ticker','t_open','t_high','t_low','t_close','t_volume']
arr1 = [
            dict.fromkeys(keys,' '),
            dict.fromkeys(keys,' ')
        ]

arr1[0]['t_volume'] = 11250000
arr1[1]['t_volume'] = 11260000
arr1.append( {'ticker' : 'ibm', 't_date' : '1/2/2008', 't_volume' : 11270000} )
arr1.insert(3, {'ticker' : 'ibm', 't_date' : '1/3/2008', 't_volume' : 11280000} )

print "\nAssociative array inside of an INT indexed array:"
print arr1[0]['t_volume'], arr1[1]['t_volume']
print "\n ",arr1[2]
print arr1[2]['t_volume'], arr1[3]['t_volume']

Note the element(value) addition logic.

share|improve this answer
2  
Don't create a literal dict with a sequence of tuples, the syntax is needlessly verbose. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 13 '12 at 18:55
    
Now that I have spent some time on this, I definitely agree with your position of not using a sequence of tuples. However, the [Python Tutorial on Dictionaries][tutorial]:docs.python.org/2/tutorial/datastructures.html#dictionaries uses tuples as an example. Just providing stepping stones for other in the future. –  Dr.EMG Dec 13 '12 at 20:51
1  
You could use: {'one': 1, 'two': 2, 'three': 3} or if all keys are valid python identifiers: dict(one=1, two=2, three=3). –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 13 '12 at 21:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.