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I'm dealing with a pretty simple template struct that has an enum value set by whether its 2 template parameters are the same type or not.

template<typename T, typename U> struct is_same { enum { value = 0 }; };
template<typename T> struct is_same<T, T> { enum { value = 1 }; };

This is part of a library (Eigen), so I can't alter this design without breaking it. When value == 0, a static assert aborts compilation.

So I have a special numerical templated class SpecialCase that can do ops with different specializations of itself. So I set up an override like this:

template<typename T> struct SpecialCase { ... };

template<typename LT, typename RT> struct is_same<SpecialCase<LT>, SpecialCase<RT>> { enum { value = 1 }; };

However, this throws the error:

more than one partial specialization matches the template argument list

Now, I understand why. It's the case where LT == RT, which steps on the toes of is_same<T, T>. What I don't know is how to keep my SpecialCase override and get rid of the error. Is there a trick to get around this?

edit: To clarify, I need all cases where LT != RT to also be considered the same (have value 1). Not just LT == RT.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can add a special case for SpecialCase where the arguments are the same:

template < typename T >
struct is_same < SpecialCase < T >, SpecialCase < T > >
{ enum { value = 1 }; };

That is more specific than each of the ambiguous candidates.

edit: Here is the full code:

#include <iostream>
template<typename T, typename U> struct is_same {
    enum { value = 0 };
};
template<typename T> struct is_same<T, T> {
    enum { value = 1 };
};

template<typename T> struct SpecialCase {  };

template < typename T >
struct is_same < SpecialCase < T >, SpecialCase < T > >
{
  enum { value = 1 };
};

template<typename LT, typename RT> struct is_same<SpecialCase<LT>, SpecialCase<RT> > {
    enum { value = 1 };
};

int main ( int, char** )
{
std::cout 
<< is_same < SpecialCase < int >, SpecialCase < int > >::value
<< is_same < SpecialCase < int >, SpecialCase < double > >::value
<< is_same < SpecialCase < int >,  double >::value
<< is_same < double, SpecialCase < int > >::value
<< is_same < double, double >::value
<< is_same < double, int >::value
<< std::endl;
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So I take it this doesn't compile for you? It works for me on all four cases <T1, T2>, < T, T >, < SpecialCase<T>, SpecialCase<T> >and < SpecialCase<T1>, SpecialCase<T2> >. I'm using gcc 4.6.3. –  mars Dec 13 '12 at 17:08
    
Ok, this is strange. I'll post the whole code, which works for me. –  mars Dec 13 '12 at 17:10
    
Doesn't work for me: liveworkspace.org/code/FiY2J, the output is 1001 and should be 1011 –  Seth Carnegie Dec 13 '12 at 17:11
    
Oh, I didn't know you meant that it should be added to, not replace his attempt. +1, sorry for the downvote. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 13 '12 at 17:14
    
Well, my code can compile now, so it must be working. I didn't know about this, neat trick. –  user173342 Dec 13 '12 at 17:14

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