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I do not know if I am using the term 'routing' correctly, but here is the situation:

I created an .htaccess file to 'process' (dunno if my term is right) the url of my application, like this :

RewriteEngine On

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f

RewriteRule ^(.+)$ index.php?url=$1 [QSA,L]

Now I have this :

http://appname/controller/method/parameter
http://appname/$url[0]/$url[1]/$url[2]

What I did is:

  1. setup a default controller, in case it is not specified in the url
  2. setup a Controller wrapper

I did it like this

$target = new $url[0]()
$controller = new Controller($target)

The problem with that one is that I can't use the methods in the object I passed in the constructor of the Controller:

I resolved it like this :

class Controller {
  protected $target;
  protected $view;

  public function __construct($target, $view) {
    $this->target = $target;
    $this->view = $view;
  }

  public function __call($method, $arguments) {
    if (method_exists($this->target, $method)) {
        return call_user_func_array(array($this->target, $method), $arguments);
    }
  }
}

This is working fine, the problem occurs in the index where I did the routing, here it is

if(isset($url[2])){
    if(method_exists($controller, $url[1])){
         $controller->$url[1]($url[2])
    }
} else {
    if(method_exists($controller, $url[1])){
         $controller->$url[1]()
    }
}

where $controller = new Controller($target)

The problem is that the method doesn't exist, although I can use it directly without checking if method exist, how can I resolve this?

share|improve this question
    
Please stop forcing routing mechanism into the controllers. You are violating SRP. –  tereško Dec 16 '12 at 9:54
    
i replaced it.. i've realized it yesterday :D thanks!!! –  Joey Salac Hipolito Dec 16 '12 at 10:29

3 Answers 3

As you've already discovered, you aren't able to use method_exists when it is being handled by a magic __call method. However, you can add an extra public method to your Controller to get around this problem:

class Controller {
  protected $target;
  protected $view;

  public function __construct($target, $view) {
    $this->target = $target;
    $this->view = $view;
  }

  public function hasMethod($method) {
    return is_callable(array($this->target, $method));
  }

  public function __call($method, $arguments) {
    if (!is_callable(array($this->target, $method))) {
        throw new \BadMethodCallException("Method `$method` is not callable");
    }

    return call_user_func_array(array($this->target, $method), $arguments);
  }
}

So...

if(isset($url[2])){
    if($controller->hasMethod($url[1])){
         $controller->$url[1]($url[2])
    }
} else {
    if($controller->hasMethod($url[1])){
         $controller->$url[1]()
    }
}

EDIT: Changed method_exists to is_callable to ensure only public methods return true.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, i wonder if there is a more efficient way. –  Joey Salac Hipolito Dec 13 '12 at 23:25

Short answer: you are doing it wrong. Now a bit longer one ...

The main issue here is that you are trying to shoehorn the routing mechanism in the controller. Controller in modern MVC patterns is responsible for taking information from user input, and apply it to model layer and/or current view to change their states.

It should not be responsible for extracting the information from raw input data. That should be done by some form of routing mechanism, which is used before your code actually hits the MVC triad. Preferably in bootstrap/initiation stage of your application.

Basically you do something like:

$uri = isset( $_GET['url'] ) ? $_GET['url'] : '/';
$request = new Request;
$request->setUrl( $url );

$router = new Router;
$router->route( $request );

$class = $request->getParameter('controller');
$method = $request->getParameter('action');

if ( !class_exists( $class ))
{
    $class  = 'ErrorController';
    $method = 'missingController';
}

if ( !is_callable( [$class, $method] ))
{
    $class  = 'ErrorController';
    $method = 'missingAction';
}

$controller = new $class( /* inject some dependencies */ );
$controller->{$method}( $request );

This of course is simplified and somewhat clumsy example. Do not copy-paste in production code.

share|improve this answer
    
also .. code is not tested –  tereško Dec 26 '12 at 23:11
    
ahh, thank you for that teresko!.. –  Joey Salac Hipolito Dec 27 '12 at 18:42
    
I wonder what does the $router->route($request); did? did it process the $request, then return it to the variable? –  Joey Salac Hipolito Jan 27 '13 at 19:40
    
The route() method "prepare" the Request instance. In a real world implementation I would import possible routes in the Router instance, which would be turned into regular expressions. The route() method in that case would loop through all the expression till first match is found. In which case the data, that gets extracted from that regexp, is assigned to the Request instance. Basically the route() method prepares the Request. –  tereško Jan 27 '13 at 20:14
    
I imagine that there would be setUri function and getParameter function in the Request class, and the Router class prepares the request, presumably , it sets the corresponding controller and action,.. so before the request calls the getParameters the controller and action has already been set, so I imagine that inside the router class, it sets a req array, e.g. set->req('controller', $this->controller), like so? –  Joey Salac Hipolito Jan 27 '13 at 20:30

Use is_callable() instead of method_exists() and it will return the correct result.

share|improve this answer
    
let me try this. thanks!! –  Joey Salac Hipolito Dec 13 '12 at 23:30
    
This is misleading - is_callable will ALWAYS return true when called on the decorator because of the magic __call fallback. It doesn't take into account what the outcome of this call is. The only way to get the desired result in this case is to ask the decorator if it's object has the method. Although it is probably better to use is_callable within this method though as method_exists will return true for protected/private methods, which wouldn't be callable. –  RobMasters Dec 14 '12 at 9:41

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