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I'm using EF 5 on .Net 4

I have the following model:

public class Order
{

    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string OrderId { get; set; }

    public Address BillingAddress { get; set; }
    public Address DeliveryAddress { get; set; }
    public ICollection<OrderLine> OrderLines { get; set; }
}

public class OrderLine
{
    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string Description { get; set; }
    public decimal UnitPrice { get; set; }
    public int Quantity { get; set; }
    public string SKU { get; set; }
    public decimal ShippingCost { get; set; }
    public decimal Tax { get; set; }
}

public class Address
{
    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Addressee { get; set; }
    public string AddressLine1 { get; set; }
    public string AddressLine2 { get; set; }
    public string AddressLine3 { get; set; }
    public string Town { get; set; }
    public string County { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }
    public string Postcode { get; set; }
}

and model configuration:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().HasMany(x => x.OrderLines).WithRequired().WillCascadeOnDelete();
    modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().HasOptional(x => x.BillingAddress).WithOptionalDependent().WillCascadeOnDelete();
    modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().HasOptional(x => x.DeliveryAddress).WithOptionalDependent().WillCascadeOnDelete();

    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
}

when I run the following query I get sql with 19 Joins which seems excessive for the simple relationship

context.Orders
       .Where(x => x.OrderId == orderId)
       .Include(x => x.OrderLines)
       .Include(x => x.BillingAddress)
       .Include(x => x.DeliveryAddress)
       .FirstOrDefault();

Am I doing something wrong? Is there a different to format the linq query to optimize the produced SQL?

EDIT:

This is the actual query: https://gist.github.com/4278014

share|improve this question
    
19?? That really doesn't sound right! HAve you got the SQL it made? –  Justin Harvey Dec 13 '12 at 17:06
    
@JustinHarvey I added the query to the question. –  marto Dec 13 '12 at 17:10
1  
That is one awesome query for sure. Remove all 3 includes and check the SQL again. If it looks normal, then add the includes back in one by one to narrow down the problem. –  Rick B Dec 13 '12 at 17:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the problem is with the WithOptionalDependent on the billing and delivery addresses. This creates a 1:1 relationship between the address and the order, even though the tables are set up for a 1:many relationship.

If you change the configuration to use WithMany instead:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().HasMany(x => x.OrderLines).WithRequired().WillCascadeOnDelete();
    modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().HasOptional(x => x.BillingAddress).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete();
    modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().HasOptional(x => x.DeliveryAddress).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete();

    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
}

the query is much simpler, and is essentially equivalent to:

...
FROM [Orders]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [Addresses] As B ON [Orders].[BillingAddress_Id] = B.[Id]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [Addresses] As D ON [Orders].[DeliveryAddress_Id] = D.[Id]
LEFT OUTER JOIN [OrderLines] ON [Orders].[Id] = [OrderLines].[Order_Id]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. It worked as you said. Here is the new query: gist.github.com/4283933 –  marto Dec 14 '12 at 9:15

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