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I'm trying to write a program that shows duplicate records to the user to correct the data or remove the duplicate rows. It works, but I had to put a Where clause in my lambda expression to get this working. How can I remove this useless clause?

Where(d => d.Id > 0) at line 22.

public class Person
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int Age { get; set; }
    }

    public class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Person> dt = new List<Person>();
            dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 1, Name = "MICHAEL JACKSON", Age = 50 });
            dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 2, Name = "MICHAEL JACKSON", Age = 51 });
            dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 3, Name = "JOHN LENNON", Age = 40 });
            dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 4, Name = "JOHN LENNON", Age = 41 });
            dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 5, Name = "ELVIS PRESLEY", Age = 42 });

            var duplicates = dt.AsEnumerable().GroupBy(r => r.Name).Where(gr => gr.Count() > 1).ToList();
            if (duplicates.Any())
            {
                var query = duplicates.SelectMany(c => c.Where(d => d.Id > 0)).AsQueryable();

                foreach (var item in query)
                    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} - {1}", item.Name, item.Age));
            }
            else
                Console.WriteLine("No records duplicates.");

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

This is just sample code, my code does a lot of other checks, but if somebody knows how to remove this clause it will be very helpful to me. I think it could impact performance.

share|improve this question
1  
What is line 22? –  Kaf Dec 13 '12 at 17:18
1  
In this sample you can simply remove it –  Sergey Berezovskiy Dec 13 '12 at 17:19
2  
What happens if you leave the Where() out and just use SelectMany(c => c)? –  Daniel Brückner Dec 13 '12 at 17:20
    
Daniel Brückner, SelectMany(c => c) solved the problem for me. Thanks. –  user1203003 Dec 13 '12 at 18:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This works for me.

            var query = duplicates.SelectMany(c => c).AsQueryable();
share|improve this answer

this here also works:

    List<Person> dt = new List<Person>();
    dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 1, Name = "MICHAEL JACKSON", Age = 50 });
    dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 2, Name = "MICHAEL JACKSON", Age = 51 });
    dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 3, Name = "JOHN LENNON", Age = 40 });
    dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 4, Name = "JOHN LENNON", Age = 41 });
    dt.Add(new Person() { Id = 5, Name = "ELVIS PRESLEY", Age = 42 });

    var duplicates = dt.GroupBy(r => r.Name).Where(gr => gr.Count() > 1).ToList();
    if (duplicates.Any())
    {

        foreach (var item in duplicates)
            Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} - {1}", item.Key, string.Join(",", item.Select(p => p.Age))));
    }
    else
        Console.WriteLine("No records duplicates.");

    Console.ReadLine();
share|improve this answer
    
Also because you collapsed the query to a List when searching for duplicates, there is no reason to iterate it again with a .Any() call, you can just do a .Count > 0. But this is just a small optimization. –  dutzu Dec 13 '12 at 17:26
    
It should be AsQueryable() 'couse in my real application my method returns IQueryable to be used in a gridview and need to show dupilcates records found in diferent lines. For me SelectMany(c => c) suggest by Daniel Brückner works. Thanks anyway for clarification. –  user1203003 Dec 13 '12 at 19:06

thats becouse duplicates is the grouped by object. try this if you only want to show the name:

var query = duplicates.Select(c => c.Key);
foreach (var item in query)
    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0}", item));

try this if you want to show repeated ages:

var query = duplicates.SelectMany(i => i);
foreach (var item in query)
    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} - {1}", item.Name, item.Age));
share|improve this answer
    
Also he can remove the .AsEnumerable() when getting the duplicates or remove the .ToList() at the end because they are redundant when used together like that. –  dutzu Dec 13 '12 at 17:21
    
And later select item.Name, item.Age from key? Maybe I don't see something obvious, but I still don't understand why this answer was upvoted. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Dec 13 '12 at 17:22
    
i think there is a mistake, it should be select of Values to get the items involved. The Keys will only return the names for which duplicates were found. –  dutzu Dec 13 '12 at 17:24
    
doh, i missed age listing, now it should work for requirements –  lante Dec 13 '12 at 17:35

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