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I need the set the elements of a very large array in a loop. The loop may continue in certain cases, so the array position must be counted separately.

I always need to set 10 consecutive elements. (10 is an example. In some scenarios, I might need 30 or more.)

Is k+c (c=0,1,2,... constant) or k++ a better approach? Which is more efficient from the two solutions below, and why?

int k = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < aVeryHighNumber; i++) {                 
    if (continueRequired()) {
        continue;
    }

    k = ... // get k as a result of a certain calculation

    veryLargeArray[k++] = value0; // these values might be calculated on-the-fly
    veryLargeArray[k++] = value1;
    veryLargeArray[k++] = value2;
    veryLargeArray[k++] = value5;
    veryLargeArray[k++] = value4;
    veryLargeArray[k++] = value5;
    veryLargeArray[k++] = value6;
    veryLargeArray[k++] = value4;
    veryLargeArray[k++] = value7;
    veryLargeArray[k++] = value1;                   
}

The second solution:

for (int i = 0; i < aVeryHighNumber; i++) {                 
    if (continueRequired()) {
        continue;
    }

    k = ... // get k as a result of a certain calculation

    veryLargeArray[k]      = value0;
    veryLargeArray[k + 1]  = value1;
    veryLargeArray[k + 2]  = value2;
    veryLargeArray[k + 3]  = value5;
    veryLargeArray[k + 4]  = value4;
    veryLargeArray[k + 5]  = value5;
    veryLargeArray[k + 6]  = value6;
    veryLargeArray[k + 7]  = value4;
    veryLargeArray[k + 8]  = value7;
    veryLargeArray[k + 9]  = value1;
}

In theory, the second solution performs 9 add operations (it's basically an unrolled loop), while the first one does 9 incrementing, i.e. it needs to store the value of k as well. However, self-incrementing by one is probably a very efficient operation nowadays, so I'm not sure if the second solution is faster or not.

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1  
If it's a "very large array", why don't you use an ArrayList? –  GGrec Dec 13 '12 at 17:21
11  
This is micro-optimization at its (next to) worst. I'm sure you have bigger fish to fry than worry about this infinitesimal performance concern. –  Perception Dec 13 '12 at 17:22
1  
Your first example continue to increment again and again while the second one restart to 0 each time –  Gilles Hemmerlé Dec 13 '12 at 17:22
    
@Gilles Hemmerlé: Good spot, thanks, I've just corrected it now. –  Thomas Calc Dec 13 '12 at 17:23
1  
++ and -- are not atomic (and single) operations in Java, so there not much difference between two approaches. –  Amir Pashazadeh Dec 13 '12 at 17:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As far as the compiled code is represented it is simply binary additions. The ++ code is simply short hand for +1. When these are converted to binary additions after compiling there is no difference between the two.

Even if there does happen to be a difference any modern computer would show no difference in computation times until you do this 1000's of times.

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and even if it is 100's of times, the compiler does normally enhance the code, for easier calculations (which does not mean that you should not care about efficiency, but in your case there is absolutely no difference) –  GameDroids Dec 13 '12 at 17:29
    
The reason I was wondering is that in the first case, the incremented value of k is stored back to k. In the second case, k is not written at all. So I wasn't sure if the compiler will optimize the sequence of k++ operations or not. And yes, the loop has very many (hundreds of thousands) iterations. –  Thomas Calc Dec 13 '12 at 17:35

It's not likely to make a difference. Find more important things to worry about.

(Any difference made by the extra assignment will be optimized out by the JIT. It is genuinely likely the performance difference is nonexistent, not just small.)

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