Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Sorting a Doubly Linked List C++ Question

as of right now the sort function that I have only sorts 1 node out of the many.

I need this function disregard the node that is sorted only after it is printed.

I've tried removing the node so that it is not considered twice for the sort, because It will keep printing that same sorted node over and over again. That didnt work so here i am.

This is defined and its where I call my sorting function. It has one node *Paramater and returns a node.

void list::displayByName(ostream& out) const
{
 node *current_node  = headByName; // is  @the head of the list
 node *evil_node     = tail;

 while ( current_node != NULL )
 {
  current_node = sort( current_node );
  out << current_node->item.getName() << endl;
 }
}

Defined as a private function of my list class.

list::node * const list::sort( node *given_node ) const
{ 
 node *least_found_node = NULL;
 node *current_node    = given_node->nextByName;

 while ( current_node && current_node != given_node ) // while current_node != NULL and..
 {   
  if ( strcmp( current_node->item.getName(), given_node->item.getName() ) < 0 )
  {
   if ( least_found_node == NULL ||  
      ( strcmp( least_found_node->item.getName(), current_node->item.getName() ) > 0 ) )
   {
    least_found_node = current_node;
   }
  }
  current_node = current_node->nextByName;

 }

 return least_found_node; // return that sorted node
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Gert Arnold, tereško, Carl Veazey, Dan, WATTO Studios Oct 2 '12 at 2:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This is confusing are you sorting the list or just the contents of the node? Any mixture does not make sense to me. –  Mark Sep 6 '09 at 20:26
    
    
Im sorting the list. –  user40120 Sep 6 '09 at 20:35
    
It successfully sorts one node, But it keeps printing that Node because, it is the lowest node, So the function keeps returning it. I need to sort the rest, a second_least_node. –  user40120 Sep 6 '09 at 20:38
1  
@lampshade: This is your third variation of this question, and you don't seem to be making much progress. Part of the problem may be that your questions are unclear: they use imprecise vocabulary, and you don't really say what is preventing you from moving forward. Are you stuck because (1) you don't actually understand the probelm that has been posed for you, (2) you don't know how to solve the problem using (say) a bunch on index cards and a pencil, (3) you can't translate the solution into the need c++ syntax, or (4) some other reason? –  dmckee Sep 6 '09 at 21:20
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

I bet you won't benefit from my answer, but there are O(Nlog(N)) algorithms that are applicable to doubly-linked lists.

The first one is merge-sort. This algorithm is applicable not only to doubly-linked lists, but for any sets (if we assume the Axiom of choice ;-) ). You select an arbitrary element from the list and then bulk your list into two piles: elements that are greater than the one picked and the elements that are greater that it. Then you recursively sort these piles and merge them together.

The second one is Hoare's quicksort. You pick an arbitrary element and iterate the list from its ends towards each other. You swap values referenced by the iterators if first one is greater that selected value and the second one is lower (we sort ascendingly). When iterators meet, you sort list to the left and list to the right in the same way.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think you are trying to do this all wrong. Your algorithm is likely to be extremely inefficient since you are doing a linear search repeatedly through the whole list. I would copy the list into an array, and then sort the array. Something like this:

node *current_node  = headByName

std::vector<node *> list;
while (current_node)
{
  list.push_back(current_node);
  current_node = current_node->nextByName;
}

std::sort(list.begin(), list.end(), someKindOfSortByNameFunction);

std::foreach(list.begin(), list.end(), std::ostream_iterator<node>(out, std::endl));
share|improve this answer
1  
Or use a sort algorithm which can be used with linked list structures, such as merge sort. –  Dirk Sep 6 '09 at 20:37
    
Im trying to get around the array. –  user40120 Sep 6 '09 at 20:39
    
what would i do after declaring a node **nArray = new node*[size]; ? –  user40120 Sep 6 '09 at 22:24
    
What do you want to do with it? –  1800 INFORMATION Sep 6 '09 at 23:05
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.