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Recently I needed to compare two sets of historical data. Since sometimes a day or two was missing in one of them and I wanted to be precise, I decided to create a list of all possible dates and two lists of tuples containing dates and corresponding values belonging to both sets. Then I changed the latter lists to Maps in order to improve date lookups.

The idea was to try to find every date from the full dates list in both Mapped list and create a list of "triples" of (date, value1, value2) containing only dates where both data sets had a date and a value. Then I could write them to a file and properly compare them.

DON'T MIND THE CODE, IT'S INCLUDED ONLY FOR GOOD MEASURE

Here is the code (it is not optimal at all, but for that small task it did its job nicely):

import qualified Data.Map as M
import Data.List (transpose)
import Data.Maybe (fromJust)

main = do
    dts     <- readFile "dates.txt"
    cts1    <- readFile "eu.txt"
    cts2    <- readFile "usa.txt"
    let
        dates  = lines dts
        cols1  = transpose $ map words $ lines cts1
        cols2  = transpose $ map words $ lines cts2
        prs1   = zip (head cols1) (last cols1)
        prs2   = zip (head cols2) (last cols2)
        map1   = M.fromList prs1
        map2   = M.fromList prs2
        trips  = map fromJust (filter (/=Nothing) (map (\date -> getTrips date map1 map2) dates))
        cols3  = map (\(a,b,c) -> [a,b,c]) trips
        result = unlines $ map unwords $ cols3
    writeFile "trips.txt" result

getTrips :: String -> M.Map String String -> M.Map String String -> Maybe (String, String, String)
getTrips date map1 map2
    | is1 /= Nothing && is2 /= Nothing    = Just (date, fromJust is1, fromJust is2)
    | otherwise                           = Nothing
    where
        is1 = M.lookup date map1
        is2 = M.lookup date map2

TL;DR: The code worked (though I would gladly hear some opinions/advice), but I have some questions:

  • there were only around 2000 dates, therefore I didn't care much about performance (you can see that I was using Strings everywhere); was using Data.Map an overkill then? When should Data.Map be preferred over lists of tuples?
  • the Map was created from tuples of Strings - is it fine or should the key always be numeric in order for the balancing and lookups to work properly?
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1  
If you're using a list of tuples as a key-value map, you're probably better off with Data.Map. The key can be any Ord type and it will work fine, but for more specific types there might be something better than Data.Map you could use instead, such as some flavor of trie. –  C. A. McCann Dec 13 '12 at 19:05
    
Well, I guess you could say that it was a key-value case; I was wondering if in a general situation when one must search for values using some index it is considered a good practice to always use Map or some other specialized type instead of the naive tuple list, even if the problem isn't big - or rather when a Map becomes necessary. –  yzb3 Dec 13 '12 at 19:32
1  
When it becomes necessary is something that can really only be answered based on profiling and the specific needs of your program. That said, the only time I would use a list of tuples is if I was doing something Data.Map and friends don't support, such as searching on either component (i.e., a bidirectional multimap). –  C. A. McCann Dec 13 '12 at 19:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

there were only around 2000 dates, therefore I didn't care much about performance (you can see that I was using Strings everywhere); was using Data.Map an overkill then? When should Data.Map be preferred over lists of tuples?

You should use data structures that fit your problem and performance/programming-time constraints, so using a Map was probably a good idea. Maybe in your case if your data was already ordered you could have done

union [] _ = []
union _ [] = []
union xss@((dx,vx):xs) yss@((dy,vy):ys) = 
    case compare dx dy of
         EQ -> (dx, vx, vy) : union xs ys
         GT -> union xss ys
         LT -> union xs yss

the Map was created from tuples of Strings - is it fine or should the key always be numeric in order for the balancing and lookups to work properly?

No, if your code typechecks your Map will work properly (w/r/t the way you've defined Ord instance). But as C. A. McCann suggests, a trie may be more appropriate if your keys are lists, especially if there is much overlap between key prefixes (look at how the Ord instance on lists is implemented, and imagine the number of operations that have to take place to insert the keys "abcdx", "abcdy", and "abcdz" into a Map vs. a trie structure to convince yourself).

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I like your union proposal a lot; as the data was already sorted, I totally prefer this simple and clever solution to the "well, it works" one. And the advice on considering a trie in such situations is spot-on, as date strings are very similar. –  yzb3 Dec 13 '12 at 20:26

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