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Consider I have this extension method:

public static bool HasAnyFlagInCommon(this System.Enum type, Enum value)
{
    var flags = value.ToString().Split(new string[] { ", " }, 
                                    StringSplitOptions.None);
    foreach (var flag in flags)
    {
        if (type.ToString() == flag)
            return true;
    }
    return false;
}

And the following situation:

[Flags]
enum Bla
{
    A = 0,
    B = 1,
    C = 2,
    D = 4
}

Bla foo = Bla.A | Bla.B;
Bla bar = Bla.A;

bar.HasAnyFlagInCommon(foo); //returns true

I want to check if foo has any flags in common with bar, but there got to be a better way of achiving this behavior in the extension method.

I also tried like this, but is always returns true:

    public static bool HasAnyFlagInCommon(this System.Enum type, Enum value)
    {
        var flags = Enum.GetValues(value.GetType()).Cast<Enum>()
                                 .Where(item => value.HasFlag(item));
        foreach (var flag in flags)
        {
            if (type == flag)
                return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Something like

public static bool HasAnyFlagInCommon(this System.Enum type, Enum value)
{
    return (((long)type) & ((long)value)) != 0;
}

The & gives 1 for any bit that is set in both enums, so if there are any such bits the result is non-zero.

(I've used long in the hope it will work for whatever type underlies the enum; int should be fine in your case.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, very nice! –  user1901943 Dec 13 '12 at 20:05

You can simply cast the Enum value to a ulong (to account for the possibility that the underlying type is not the default of int). If the result != 0, at least one flag was set.

ulong theValue = (ulong)value;
return (theValue != 0);

Remember, at the end of the day, the enum is backed by one of byte, sbyte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, or ulong.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sbbt4032.aspx

A flag being set is the same as a corresponding bit being turned on in the backing type. The ulong above will only be 0 if all bits are turned off.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you got the wrong idea, I edited my question to clear things up. Still using the underlying number could be a solution. –  user1901943 Dec 13 '12 at 19:54
    
Also, even if this was "are any defined flags set", it wouldn't return the right result if a bit had been set somehow what wasn't one of the defined flags. –  Rawling Dec 13 '12 at 19:58

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