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I am using a member variable and at some point of the program I want to change it, but i prefer to "lock it" everywhere else to prevent unintended changes.

Code to explain:

class myClass {
    int x;  // This should be prevented to being changed most of the time
    int y;  // Regular variable
    myclass() {x = 1;}
    void foo1 () {x++; y++;} // This can change x
    void foo2 () {x--; y--;} // This shouldn't be able to change x
                             // I want it to throw a compile error
};

The question is: Can it be achieved in some way? Something like permanent const_cast?

I know I could use constructor initialization list and constant right away, but i need to change my variable later.

share|improve this question
2  
make it private, and only change it when you want to? – Chad Dec 13 '12 at 18:52
    
You want to prevent the implementation from changing x, or do you want to prevent anyone from calling the method? – Joe Dec 13 '12 at 18:55
    
@Joe: I want to throw it an error at compile. – Petr Dec 13 '12 at 18:56
2  
void foo2 () const {x--;} – Joe Dec 13 '12 at 18:57
3  
why is foo2 modifying x at all, if u dont want it to? – Chad Dec 13 '12 at 19:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Alright, all the other answers I dislike, so here's my idea: hide the variable.

#define READONLY(TYPE, VAR) const TYPE& VAR = this->VAR //C++03
#define READONLY(VARIABLE) const auto& VARIABLE = this->VARIABLE //C++11

class myClass {
    int x;  // This should be prevented to being changed most of the time
    int y;  // Regular variable
    myClass() :x(1), y(2) {}
    void foo1 () {// This can change x
        x++; 
        y++;
    } 
    void foo2 () {// This shouldn't be able to change x
        READONLY(x); //in this function, x is read-only
        x++; //error: increment of read-only variable 'x'
        y++;
    } 
};

There are still ways to bypass the locking of the variable (such as this->x), but nothing can be done for those situations.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems to me if you're going to do this, you want something like #define lock(v) const auto &v = this->v, so in the function it shows up as lock(x); /* ... */. A template might let you do the same more cleanly. – Jerry Coffin Dec 13 '12 at 19:36
    
That is elegant solution if I want to prevent editing in just one function, but can I prevent it in general? – Petr Dec 13 '12 at 19:37
1  
@Petr: There's no way to generalize that even in theory. In the question you had comments to tell us which variables are locked in which functions. The compiler will need that same general sort of information. Its easy to make it not editable in any function, but if it's editable in some, you have to tell us/the compiler which functions. – Mooing Duck Dec 13 '12 at 19:39
    
A mistake in C++11 version - not const auto& x but const auto& VARIABLE. Anyway - easy to break - just do this->x++... – PiotrNycz Dec 13 '12 at 23:40
    
@PiotrNycz: I considered that, but I've now put it in the answer. – Mooing Duck Dec 13 '12 at 23:48
class myClass {
    int x;
    mutable int y;
public:
    myclass() : x(1) {}
    void foo1 () {x++; y++}      // this can change x or y
    void foo2 () const { y--; }  // this can't change x by can change y
};

If you mark a member function const like this, you can't do anything in that member that would modify a member of the object (unless that member is mutable or static -- and static isn't really a member of an object at all).

Note that this won't simply prevent you from calling a function that attempts to do such modification -- rather, a function that's marked const but tries to modify the object state won't compile at all.

I should add, however, that I'm not at all convinced that this is really the best design. Rather the contrary, it sounds to me like your requirements on x and y are sufficiently complex that they would probably make more sense as separate classes that enforce the proper constraints directly (e.g., by providing an overload for operator= that only accepts input under the correct circumstances).

In other words, the use of mutable I've shown above is (I think) the simplest and most direct answer to the question you've asked, but it seems fairly probable that you're not really asking the question you should, and you're more likely to benefit from changing the design -- unfortunately, you haven't told us enough about the "big picture" to suggest what the better design might be.

share|improve this answer
    
@MooingDuck: Thanks. Updated. – Jerry Coffin Dec 13 '12 at 19:06
    
mutable? I think I would have dropped the const idea and gone with hiding the variable personally. Or unit tests or something. – Mooing Duck Dec 13 '12 at 19:07
1  
@MooingDuck: It's the most direct answer to what he's asking. I suppose I should add a bit of warning though. – Jerry Coffin Dec 13 '12 at 19:07
1  
Well, it is a good idea, unfortuantely it would imply, that al regular variables would have to be mutable, and all regular functions would have to be const, right? And I feel it is not a good idea to write it like that. – Petr Dec 13 '12 at 19:15
1  
@Petr: Yes, as I said in the answer, I think what you need is a different design -- but don't know enough to be sure what that design should be. – Jerry Coffin Dec 13 '12 at 19:20

Well, I am not sure it is worth your effort, anyway, just in case this is quiz or sth, try to combine private inheritance with friend:

class MyClassX {
protected:
  MyClassX() : x(1) {}
  int x;
public:
  int getX() const { return x; } // read only access
};
class MyClassY {
protected:
  MyClassY() : y(0) {}
  int y;
  friend class MyClass;
public:
  int getY() const { return y; }
};
class MyClassXY : private MyClassX, private MyClassY {
public:
    void foo1 () {x++; y++}      // this can change x or y
};
MyClass : public MyClassXY {
public:
    void foo2 () const { y--; }  // this can't change x but can change y
};
share|improve this answer
    
Not a test, but simply my curiosity. – Petr Dec 13 '12 at 19:17
    
@Petr - I did not try my solution, let me know if it is something to fix. According to my best knowledge it should meet your constraints. – PiotrNycz Dec 13 '12 at 19:22
    
@Petr (+1) for curiosity, I always believe this is good thing. – PiotrNycz Dec 13 '12 at 19:23

Make x a private member of a subClass, and make foo1 a friend function of the subClass. Like this:

class myClass {
    int y;  // Regular variable
    myClass() : x (1) {}
    void foo1 () {x.x++; y++;} // This can change x
    void foo2 () {x.x--; y--;} // This shouldn't be able to change x
                            // I want it to throw a compile error
    class subClass {
      friend void myClass::foo1() ; // This must come after the declaration of foo1
      int x ; // private
    public:
      subClass (int x) : x (x) { }
      int read_x() const { return x ; }
      } x ;
};

This throws a compiler error, just where you wanted it.

share|improve this answer
    
I got confused since you never use read_x, but you're right: ideone.com/JTkfSq – Mooing Duck Dec 13 '12 at 20:10
    
@Mooing Duck: What use is a write-only variable? – TonyK Dec 13 '12 at 20:11

Well you cannot do what your are trying to do... Somebody correct me if I am wrong.

share|improve this answer
1  
He wants foo1 to change x, but not foo2 – Chad Dec 13 '12 at 18:57
    
@benjarobin: the variables can be locked by hiding them – Mooing Duck Dec 13 '12 at 19:08
    
@Mooing Duck: But if I hide it (whatever that means), could I use it for read only purpose somewhere else? – Petr Dec 13 '12 at 19:16
    
@Petr: yes, if it's only hidden in the one function. – Mooing Duck Dec 13 '12 at 19:23

Technically, the answer is no, as long the class can see the variable and it's not constant - it can modify it. But you could accomplish what you want by decoupling the variable you want locked into a separate class.

share|improve this answer

Create a class with a private x variable. In it write your method.

Derive from this class your actual class. Make the x holder a friend of the actual class.

X holder uses CRTP like casting (static cast to base) in the x holder to turn this into a pointer to your actual class.

Expose an x getter from your x holder.

I would not bother myself, but this is better than abusing mutable and const.

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