Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Generating HTML source on backend, I am using separate independent widgets.

I am simply including pieces of markup like this to the resulting HTML output.

 <div>
     I want to work with this DOM element
     <script>
          new Obj(/*but I can't get this <div> as a parameter! */);
     </script>
 </div>

I'm looking for a way to find the DOM element in which the obj is created (Without any unique IDs). This would add flexibility to my app and speed up the development. But is that technicaly possible in JavaScript?

share|improve this question
3  
If you are generating it on the backend, assign a unique id to the <div>, and pass the same id into whatever code is in the <script> tag when it is generated. –  Michael Berkowski Dec 13 '12 at 19:15
2  
Instead of placing the script in a div, why not just have the script generate the div and then you have access to it immediately? –  j08691 Dec 13 '12 at 19:17
    
under window dom everything follows the xml node structure, so you can alternately lookup parent node and its attributes. in this case the enclosing div. –  SriN Dec 13 '12 at 19:46
    
Guys, the solution with unique ID is quite nice, I was just asking of the way to keep the code as simple as possible –  Dan Dec 13 '12 at 19:47
    
@user711819: honestly, I hear about parentXML method in JavaScript for the first time. Could you please show me some code? How can I access the parent DOM element from the running script? –  Dan Dec 13 '12 at 19:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The following code works:

function Obj (color) {
    var scriptTags = document.getElementsByTagName("script");
    var scriptTag = scriptTags[scriptTags.length - 1];
    // find parent or do whatsoever
    var divTag = scriptTag.parentNode;
    divTag.style.backgroundColor = color;
}
<div>
     I want to work with this DOM element
     <script>new Obj("green");</script>
</div>
<div>
     I want to work with this DOM element
     <script>new Obj("yellow");</script>
</div>
<div>
     I want to work with this DOM element
     <script>new Obj("lime");</script>
</div>
​

Demo here

This method has very simple code and has almost zero impact on performance.

Note: I am pretty sure this won't work IE6 (as far as I remember it does not support manipulating open tags).

share|improve this answer
2  
arg...you beat me. –  goat Dec 13 '12 at 19:22
    
Nobody cares about old IE –  Dan Dec 13 '12 at 20:18

You could seed an element in there and then get it's parent, and then remove the element.

<div>
 I want to work with this DOM element
 <script>
      document.write("<div id='UniqueGUID_3477zZ7786_' style='display:none;'></div>");
      var thatDivYouWanted;
      (function(){
       var target = document.getElementById("UniqueGUID_3477zZ7786_");
       thatDivYouWanted = target.parentNode;
       target.parentNode.removeChild(target);
      })();
      new Obj(/*but I can't get this <div> as a parameter! */);
 </script>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
that was quite a solution +1 –  Kamyar Nazeri Dec 13 '12 at 19:24
1  
Crazy hack, but does the job. –  Michael Berkowski Dec 13 '12 at 19:35

I believe your approach is not ideal. If you're trying to obtain the <div>, it should be done programmatically in a conventional way using JavaScript and the API's that empower you to query the target <div>

Instead of executing inline, you can execute in a separate scope in a controlled way (DOM Ready then Query then Your Method). You can target your div by using an ID, CSS class name, or any other CSS selector in JavaScript.

This allows you to pretty much do the follow anywhere you want, not inline.

// on dom ready...
var div = document.getElementById('myDiv'), // replace with any other selector method
    myObject = new Object(div);

Need to find your div? https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/Document.querySelectorAll

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, my approach is not perfect, but it allows to divide the code in standalone chunks that are quite independent do not know anything about each other –  Dan Dec 13 '12 at 20:14
    
You can divide the code in such chunks using functions. Keep in mind that inline javascript code is executed along with the interpretation of the HTML, so the next div will not be shown to the user until the code in the previous div has been executed completely. –  WebStakker Dec 13 '12 at 20:19

If you know beforehand how the page will be structured, you could use for example:

document.getElementsByTagName("div")[4]

to access the 5th div.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, I dont –  Dan Dec 13 '12 at 19:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.