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I have a batch file that I'd like to compare the contents of two text files (test1.txt and test2.txt). I'd like it to search through each entry in test1.txt and look for each entry in test2.txt and advise whether the entry has been found or not. I've been searching around for some input, but can't seem to come up with anything helpful.

For example, test1.txt contains: red blue green orange

and test2.txt contains: red blue orange

Ideally I'd like it to tell me it can't find "green"...

I was thinking it should be something like this:

@ECHO OFF

FOR /F %%A IN (C:\test1.txt) DO (
    FIND /I %%A C:\test2.txt
    IF %ERRORLEVEL% EQU 0 (ECHO Sring found!) ELSE (ECHO string not found!)
)

... but this doesn't prove to do much for me. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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2 Answers 2

Your code has two problems:

1) The FIND command requires the search string to be quoted.

2) Your logic is almost correct. The problem is %ERRORLEVEL% is expanded when the line is parsed, and the entire parenthesized DO() block is parsed in one pass. So it always expands to the value that existed before the FOR loop executes - not what you want.

There are a number of simple solutions.

Use delayed expansion

@ECHO OFF
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
FOR /F %%A IN (C:\test1.txt) DO (
  FIND /I "%%A" C:\test2.txt
  IF !ERRORLEVEL! EQU 0 (ECHO Sring found^^!) ELSE (ECHO string not found^^!)
)

Use IF ERRORLEVEL (IF ERRORLEVEL 1 is true if errorlevel is 1 or greater)

@ECHO OFF
FOR /F %%A IN (C:\test1.txt) DO (
  FIND /I "%%A" C:\test2.txt
  IF NOT ERRORLEVEL 1 (ECHO Sring found!) ELSE (ECHO string not found!)
)

Use the && and || conditional operators

@ECHO OFF
FOR /F %%A IN (C:\test1.txt) DO (
  FIND /I "%%A" C:\test2.txt && (ECHO Sring found!) || (ECHO string not found!)
)
share|improve this answer

You can just use findstr with parameter /V to print lines that don't contain a match, and /G to read search strings from a file. As dbenham suggested, it's better also to add the /L option to force a literal search, like this:

findstr /L /V /G:text2.txt text1.txt

This will print all lines in text1.txt that are not present in text2.txt

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - You probably should add the /L option to force a literal search. If the /L option is not present, and the first line in text2.txt contains a meta character like ., then all searches will be treated as regex. –  dbenham Dec 13 '12 at 22:00
    
@dbenham yes, you are right! i added your suggestion to the answer.. thanks! –  fthiella Dec 14 '12 at 12:48

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