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If you take a look at this website, you'll see that as you scroll and hit certain areas, a fade in animation plays, and brings the content to view. I've tried looking through the source to try to understand how they do this, but I haven't found any luck yet.

I'm guessing they use Javascript/jQuery to add a class when the DIV appears like so:

$('#element').addClass('animation');

But the question remains of how do they know when the DIV appears to call such Javascript?

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you can use the scroll event and check the position of the and if the div is in sight add the class. –  Ibu Dec 13 '12 at 19:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's in http://hockeyapp.net/javascripts/jquery.features.js

Here it is slightly prettier:

function f_scrollTop() {
    return f_filterResults(
        window.pageYOffset ? window.pageYOffset : 0,
        document.documentElement ? document.documentElement.scrollTop : 0,
        document.body ? document.body.scrollTop : 0
    )
}

function f_filterResults(e, t, n) {
    var r = e ? e : 0;
    return t && (!r || r > t) && (r = t), n && (!r || r > n) ? n : r
}

$(document).ready(function() {
    var e = navigator.userAgent.match(/(iPad|iPhone|iPod)/i) ? !0 : !1;

    e ? ($("#crashes").css("opacity", 1),
        $("#feedback").css("opacity", 1),
        $("#distribution").css("opacity", 1),
        $("#analytics").css("opacity", 1),
        $("#customers").css("opacity", 1))
      : ($(window).scroll(function() {

            var e = $("body").height(),
                t = f_scrollTop(),
                n = 0;
            t > 250 && (n = 1), $("#crashes").css("opacity", n)

        }), $(window).scroll(function() {

            var e = $("body").height(),
                t = f_scrollTop(),
                n = 0;
            t > 2250 && (n = 1), $("#feedback").css("opacity", n)

        }), $(window).scroll(function() {

            var e = $("body").height(),
                t = f_scrollTop(),
                n = 0;
            t > 3100 && (n = 1), $("#distribution").css("opacity", n)

        }), $(window).scroll(function() {

            var e = $("body").height(),
                t = f_scrollTop(),
                n = 0;
            t > 4400 && (n = 1), $("#analytics").css("opacity", n)

        }), $(window).scroll(function() {

            var e = $("body").height(),
                t = f_scrollTop(),
                n = 0;
            t > 3200 && (n = 1), $("#customers").css("opacity", n)

        })), $(".switch-monthly").live("click", function(e) {
            $(this).addClass("switch-yearly"), $(this).removeClass("switch-monthly"), $(".price.monthly").fadeOut(), $(".price.yearly").fadeIn(), $(".save").slideDown(), e.preventDefault()
        }), $(".switch-yearly").live("click", function(e) {
            $(this).removeClass("switch-yearly"), $(this).addClass("switch-monthly"), $(".price.monthly").fadeIn(), $(".price.yearly").fadeOut(), $(".save").slideUp(), e.preventDefault()
        }), $(".fancybox").fancybox({openEffect: "elastic",closeEffect: "elastic"})
});

f_scrollTop and f_filterResults form a cross-browser way to find how far the page has been scrolled.

On document.ready, they bind five functions to $(window).scroll. Every time you scroll, it gets the distance using t = t_scrollTop(), and sets n to 1 or 0 depending on the value of t. Then sets the opacity of each of the divs (#crashes, #feedback, #distribution, #analytics, #customers) to n. (Better explanation below)

So, they don't know when the div appears - each time you scroll it checks whether or not it has and sets the opacity accordingly. Also, they don't use animate, but instead have a CSS transition set for four of the divs in http://hockeyapp.net/stylesheets/public.css (don't try reading that):

#distribution,
#crashes,
#feedback,
#analytics {
   opacity: 0;
   -webkit-transition:opacity .5s ease-in-out 0s
}

On lines like this:

t > 250 && (n = 1), $("#crashes").css("opacity", n)

The comma operator says "evaluate each expression and the value of the whole expression is the value of the last." Here it's probably just used for brevity, since the source has been minified.

Since n is already 0 and && short circuits, if t > 250 then it will evaluate (n = 1), otherwise it will leave n as 0. Then it sets the opacity to n.

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Not sure how they are doing it specifically but you may want to take a look at jQuery waypoints which would accomplish what you're trying to do: http://imakewebthings.com/jquery-waypoints/

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Another library to look at is github.com/sxalexander/jquery-scrollspy –  Andres Riofrio Dec 13 '12 at 19:45

Having a look at their source I think they are using something call anchorScroll which is here. http://www.binpress.com/app/anchorscroll/228

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You can track to see how far down the page the user has scrolled with a little bit of jQuery like this:

$(window).scroll(function(e){
    if($(this).scrollTop() > 150) //the 150 here is the height in pixels
    {
        $('#element').addClass('animation');
    }
});

In this code, the height in pixels is where you would specify how far down the page you would like for the animation to occur. You may have to play with the heights a bit to get it exactly how you want it.

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You can use the scroll api:

$(window).scroll(function (event) {
    var top = $(window).scrollTop();
     if (top > 200){ // assuming the position of your div.
        $('#element').addClass('animation');
     }
});
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