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this feels like it should be a simple task, but somehow can't wrap my brain around it. I have HTML files with headers from H1-H4. I would like to get the content between H3 tags. Not the text between <H3> and </H3> rather the text between two H3s.

<H3>some text</H3>
<p> more text that I would like to grab</p>
<H3> some other text </H3>
<p> some more text that I'd like to get </p>

... Thank you in advance

I've been asked to describe a sample output, which I thought i did in a comment below. I will restate the same, and if something is not clear, please let me know.

input: long file with many H3 headings

output: many small files each containing a fragment that starts with the line containing an H3 heading, and ends on the line before the next H3 heading.

share|improve this question
    
Better provide the sample output – Gilles Quenot Dec 13 '12 at 20:10
    
So you just want the text between </H3> and <H3> then... – twalberg Dec 13 '12 at 21:15
    
yes, pretty much, it would work like this: 1. read the H3 line 2. pass it to an awk function to get a file name 3. save it and the rest of the tex up to (and not including) the next H3 or EOF to the file determined in step 2 – Mordechai Dec 13 '12 at 21:35
    
Pease edit your question to show your required output, given your sample data. Good luck. – shellter Dec 13 '12 at 22:12
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Without you posting your expected output we're just guessing but if you literally want the text between </H3> and <H3>, here's one way with GNU awk:

$ cat file
<H3>some text</H3>
<p> more text that I would like to grab</p>
<H3> some other text </H3>
<p> some more text that I'd like to get </p>
$ gawk -F'</H3>' -v RS="<H3>" -v ORS= 'NR>1{print $NF}' file

<p> more text that I would like to grab</p>

<p> some more text that I'd like to get </p>
$

$ cat file
<H3>some text</H3><p>more text that I would like to grab</p><H3>some other text</H3><p> some more text that I'd like to get </p>
$ gawk -F'</H3>' -v RS="<H3>" -v ORS= 'NR>1{print $NF}' file
<p>more text that I would like to grab</p><p> some more text that I'd like to get </p>

$ gawk -F'</H3>' -v RS="<H3>" 'NR>1{print $NF}' file
<p>more text that I would like to grab</p>
<p> some more text that I'd like to get </p>

You need GNU awk for that so you can have a multi-character RS.

Note that when there are newlines included in the text between your blocks those are reproduced in the output just like any other characters.

If the above is not what you want, again, tell us more....

share|improve this answer
    
this is very close, I'm going to play with it to see if it works – Mordechai Dec 14 '12 at 4:51
    
thanks, this got me going in the right direction. all I needed was to use RS="<H3" (no need to worry about /H3 since I want all the text including html tags); then $0 becomes the chunk that I want and after str="<H3"$0 I can export it to a file as desired. – Mordechai Dec 14 '12 at 8:26

The problem is that HTML syntax is quite flexible. For example:

<H3>some text</H3>
<p> more text that I would like to grab</p>
<H3> some other text </H3>
<p> some more text that I'd like to get </p>

And

<H3>
    some text
</H3>
<p> 
    more
    text
    that
    I
    would
    like
    to
    grab</p>
<H3> 
  some other text
        </H3>
<p>some        more     text that I'd        like to get
</p>

Will produce the same output. Extra whitespace is stripped, and tags can be scattered all about. You can't simply look for a particular tag to know what you're after.

The only real way to do this is to use a full bred scripting language like Perl or Python that has modules that can parse and organize HTML formatted files for you. You can't parse HTML or XML with Unix's regular expressions.

Unfortunately, you've tagged this as bash, shell, or awk, and none of those can really handle HTML input in a clean manner.

share|improve this answer
1  
If you are determined to do it with regex, try man csplit. – tripleee Dec 13 '12 at 22:09
    
may be that's the answer that these tools are not a good fit for the task. somehow, though, it seems trivial enough to read a file, find a pattern, continue reading until next pattern occurrence and put results in another file, and do so until EOF. – Mordechai Dec 14 '12 at 4:53
    
It is possible to parse the file and figure out the structure. Programming languages have modules that can handle the task. Somehow, they were programmed to do so from more basic blocks. However, it is not a trivial task. Regular expressions, although powerful, cannot handle the task. The task could be made easier by imposing other restraints such as the <h3> opening and clsoing tags must appear on the same line, but HMTL doesn't require that. All of the answers use regex, but those could fail in specific circumstances without warning. Do you want to depend upon a program like that? – David W. Dec 14 '12 at 16:54
    
thanks, @tripleee, csplit would be a good choice except I need to run a lookup to determine the fragment file name. – Mordechai Dec 16 '12 at 16:08
    
Why don't you use csplit to create a temporary file for each fragment, then post-process each of these files to remove the <H3> at the start and use that as the file name for the corresponding output file? – tripleee Dec 17 '12 at 4:20

As a start, this shell line will extract the first H3 to H3 section...

$ sed -e '1,/<H3/d' -e '/<H3/,$d'
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, what do I do about the rest? – Mordechai Dec 13 '12 at 20:29

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