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How do I make the following overload work

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int subtractFive (int a)
{
    a = a - 5;

    return a;
}

int subtractFive (int &a)
{
    a = a -5;

    return a -5;
}

int main()
{
    int A = 10;

    cout << "Answer: " << subtractFive(*A) << endl;
    cout << "A Value "<< A << endl;

    cout << "Answer: " << subtractFive(A) << endl;
    cout << "A Value "<< A << endl;

    return 0;
}

Tried but doesnt compile

    #include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int subtractFive (int a)
{
    a = a - 5;

    return a;
}

void subtractFive (int* a)
{
    *a = *a -5;
}

int main()
{
    int A = 10;

    cout << "Answer: " << subtractFive(A) << endl;
    cout << "A Value "<< A << endl;

    subtractFive(A);
    cout << "A Value "<< A << endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
What exactly are you trying to do? –  Kevin Ballard Dec 13 '12 at 20:28
    
I want to to make a subract function that takes both an address and another subtract that takes the value –  stackoverflow Dec 13 '12 at 20:29
    
What is *A supposed to do? –  ildjarn Dec 13 '12 at 20:29
    
@stackoverflow: What problem are you trying to solve? –  Kevin Ballard Dec 13 '12 at 20:29
    
that was intential to point out to anyone that I want to use the function that accepts the &a –  stackoverflow Dec 13 '12 at 20:30

3 Answers 3

You might try specifying an overload that takes an address as an argument:

int subtractFive (int *a)
{
    *a = *a -5;

    return *a -5;
}
share|improve this answer

Declare one function as pass by address the other by value or reference:

void subtractByFive(int * p_value)
{
    if (p_value != NULL)
    {
       *p_value -= 5;
    }
    return;
}
share|improve this answer

A value and a reference have the same type so you can't overload on it. If you want two functions one of which modifies its parameter and one that returns the new value then you either have to give them different names or different types (e.g. make the latter function use a pointer type).

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