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What is the correct WCF security implementation/configuration that allows:

  • Using existing Windows accounts to authenticate with the service
  • Allow adding of a Service Reference from another project without providing credentials
  • Limiting the users that can call the service
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1 Answer 1

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Using existing Windows accounts to authenticate with the service

To do this, you should set the transport clientCredentialType attribute of the binding configuration to Windows.

<bindings>
   <wsHttpBinding>
      <binding>
         <security mode="Message">
            <transport clientCredentialType="Windows" />
         </security>
      </binding>
   </wsHttpBinding>
</bindings>

Allow adding of a Service Reference from another project without providing credentials

To do this, create a mex endpoint for your service endpoint.

<services>
   <service name="Services.SampleService" behaviorConfiguration="wsDefaultBehavior">
      <endpoint address="mex"  binding="mexHttpBinding" contract="IMetadataExchange" />
   </service>
</services>

Limiting the users that can call the service

This one is a little more involved. The way I found to secure a service on a per-user basis requires a custom authorization policy. The class that performs the authorization must implement the IAuthorizationPolicy interface. This is the complete code of my authorization class:

namespace Services.SampleService.Authorization
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Handles the default authorization for access to the service
    /// <para>Works in conjunction with the AuthorizedUsersDefault setting</para>
    /// </summary>
    public class DefaultAuthorization: IAuthorizationPolicy
    {

        string _Id;

        public DefaultAuthorization()
        {
            this._Id = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
        }

        public bool Evaluate(EvaluationContext evaluationContext, ref object state)
        {
            bool isAuthorized = false;
            try
            {
                //get the identity of the authenticated user
                IIdentity userIdentity = ((IIdentity)((System.Collections.Generic.List<System.Security.Principal.IIdentity>)evaluationContext.Properties["Identities"])[0]);
                //verify that the user is authorized to access the service
                isAuthorized = Properties.Settings.Default.AuthorizedUsersDefault.Contains(userIdentity.Name, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
                if (isAuthorized)
                {
                    //add the authorized identity to the current context
                    GenericPrincipal principal = new GenericPrincipal(userIdentity, null);
                    evaluationContext.Properties["Principal"] = principal;
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Logging.Log(Severity.Error, "There was an error authorizing a user", e);
                isAuthorized = false;
            }
            return isAuthorized;
        }

        public ClaimSet Issuer
        {
            get { return ClaimSet.System; }
        }

        public string Id
        {
            get { return this._Id; }
        }
    }
}

The "magic" happens in the Evaluate method. In my case, the list of authorized users is maintained in a Properties.Settings variable (of type ArrayOfString) named AuthorizedUsersDefault. This way, I can maintain the user list without having to redeploy the entire project.

And then, to use this authorization policy on a per-service basis, set the following in the ServiceBehaviors node:

<behaviors>
   <serviceBehaviors>
      <behavior name="wsDefaultBehavior">
         <serviceAuthorization principalPermissionMode="Custom">
        <authorizationPolicies>
           <add policyType="Services.SampleService.Authorization.DefaultAuthorization, MyAssemblyName" />
        </authorizationPolicies>
     </serviceAuthorization>
      </behavior>
   </serviceBehaviors>
</behaviors>
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