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I am planning to solve a particular problem by using abstract factory pattern. I was successful in implementing factory pattern but not able to extend factory pattern to Abstract factory

I have two different places where exception details can be stored

  1. File system
  2. Database

I have used factory pattern to abstract away object creation details from client

Interface

public interface ILogException
{
    void LogException();
}

FileSystemLogger

public class FileExceptionLogger : ILogException
{
    public  void LogException()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("File Exception Logger");
    }
}

DBSystemLogger

public class DBExceptionLogger : ILogException
{
    public  void LogException()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("DB Exception Logger");
    }
}

Factory Implementation

public class ExceptionFactory
{
    const int i = 1;       
    public static ILogException GetFactory()
    {
        if (i == 1)
        {
            return new FileExceptionLogger();
        }
        else if (i == 2)
        {
            return new DBExceptionLogger();
        }
        else
        {
            return new ServiceExcetionLogger();
        }
    }
}

I know this is not the best of implementation but i plan to change it.

Now FileSystemLogger and DatabaseLogger are in itself a factory, I want to group following implementation under FileSystemLogger and DatabaseLogger so that the client can have FileSystemLoggerFactory and DatabaseLoggerFactory

FileSystemLogger

  1. FlatFileSystemLogger
  2. XMLFileSystemLogger

DatabaseLogger

  1. SQLSERVERLogger
  2. OracleLogger

How should i proceed with defining FileSystemLoggerFactory and DatabaseLoggerFactory?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

If you want, you could make the factory method a generic one:

public static ILogException GetFactory<T>() where T : ILogException
{
    return (ILogException)Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
}

Call it like:

ILogException logger = ExceptionFactory.GetFactory<FileExceptionLogger>();

You also might want to take a look at a dependency injection library like NInject, Unity, etc. These can simplify this kind of problem, allowing you to centralize the logic for which interfaces get bound to which implementations. (Ie, you can bind an implementation in the application or request scope.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanx a lot for ur valuable input. Will the suggested implementation qualify for abstract factory? –  rohit Dec 13 '12 at 21:01
    
@rohit it's not a "factory" exactly, because the ILoggerException interface doesn't provide a method to create new entities. –  McGarnagle Dec 13 '12 at 21:12
    
@rohit If you don't want to use generics, you need some way of determining which implementation gets returned. The question for you is, does the coder who's using your library decide that? Does some configuration, or the project type determine it? Or how? –  McGarnagle Dec 13 '12 at 21:12

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