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I'm trying to produce code that will search for an element starting at the end of an array and work it's towards the beginning until i find what I am looking for. so far I have this, but it doesn't seem to be working:

     for (int i = randomList.length - 1; i > 0; i--)
            {
             if (randomList[i].equals(findThis))
                {
                    System.out.println("The index of what you're looking for in the array is: " + i);

                }                
            }

When I compile and run this, it produces the same answer as this:

     for (int j = 0; j < randomList.length; j++)
            {
            if (randomList[j].equals(findThis))
                {
                    System.out.println("What you're looking for is located at this index: " + j);
                }           
            }

which is weird because it is starting at the front of the array and working its way to the end. I am grateful for all help!

share|improve this question
1  
I don't see how the first iteration could go in the same direction than the second one. What makes you think it does ? – Denys Séguret Dec 13 '12 at 20:51
8  
That seems to be right - the thing is you're printing out the index where the element is found. If the array doesn't change, then it will always find it in the same index, no matter the direction in which you search. – sdasdadas Dec 13 '12 at 20:51
2  
change it to i >= 0 – hoaz Dec 13 '12 at 20:53
1  
do you actually have duplicates in the array? – ratchet freak Dec 13 '12 at 20:53
1  
@jordan time_end - time_start. Look at System.getNanoTime() – Jan Dvorak Dec 13 '12 at 21:05
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are returning the index of the found element, which is going to be the same in either direction (i.e. array[4] will be the same regardless of how you search)

If you want the count in the other direction, you could do:

for (int i = 0; i < randomList.length; i++)
{
  if (randomList[randomList.length - i - 1].equals(findThis))
    {
      System.out.println("The count from the back of the array is: " + i);
    }                
}
share|improve this answer

A quick way to get the index is to do something like this:

int idx = randomList.lastIndexOf(findThis);

Simple, one line of code that will return the last index of the given object. There is also this if you want the first index:

int idx = randomList.indexOf(findThis);
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Note that:

for (int i = randomList.length - 1; i > 0; i--)

Should be:

for (int i = randomList.length - 1; i >= 0; i--)

But otherwise it looks correct; are you sure you are cleaning / rebuilding correctly with your IDE?

If you can, provide additional context such as where the code is being run, what your data is, and what the expected vs. actual results are.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah! these amazing comments, like yours, pointed out why i was really confused. I was confusing the count with the index! heh. But, i'm a novice trying to understand how to compare which method of searching through an array would be more efficient – Jay Dec 13 '12 at 21:05

You will only get different answer if the searched value exist more than once in your array. BTW. your condition should be i >= 0 if you want to check first element in the array.

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If you have an array of:

["Dog", "Cat", "Marsupial", "Dr. Pepper", "Pepsi"]

then the index of "Dr. Pepper" will always be 3 no matter the direction in which you search.

EDIT: We use 0 indexed arrays here. :D

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You are displaying i and j values which are the position of the element in the array, when the element of the array is equal to the element you are seeking for.

Your code is correct you are just returning the index of the element you are searching for so starting from the beginning or the end it will return the same index (the same element position) unless you have more than one element that is equal to the element you are seeking for then you will notice the difference.

in order to understand what is going on you should change your code like below :

 for (int i = randomList.length - 1; i > 0; i--)
        {
         System.out.println("Actual index =" + i);
         if (randomList[i].equals(findThis))
            {
                System.out.println("The index of what you're looking for in the array is: " + i);

            }                
        }

When I compile and run this, it produces the same answer as this:

 for (int j = 0; j < randomList.length; j++)
        {
         System.out.println("Actual index =" + j);
         if (randomList[j].equals(findThis))
            {
                System.out.println("What you're looking for is located at this index: " + j);
            }           
        }
share|improve this answer

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