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C++11

There should be a one-line version of the last two lines.

        typedef std::pair<T1, T2> impl_node;
        std::vector<impl_node> impl;
        /* do stuff with impl */
        std::vector<T1> retval(impl.size());
        std::transform(impl.cbegin(), impl.cend(), retval.begin(),
                         [](const impl_node& in) { return *in.first; });

I tried writing some sort of custom iterator adapter, and the types are getting hairy. What's the "right" solution? (And it probably generalizes to all sorts of other adapters.)

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2  
Have you seen boost::transform_iterator? (And your impl is a function declaration, not an object.) –  ildjarn Dec 13 '12 at 21:09
1  
std::vector<impl_node> impl(); should probably be std::vector<impl_node> impl; –  Robᵩ Dec 13 '12 at 21:17
    
The last two lines? Or the last two statements? –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 13 '12 at 21:24
    
Why should there be a single statement that does that? (Note that the trivial approach is writting a function that does that for you: template <typename R, typename C, typename F> R transformConstruct( C const & src, F functor ) { R res; std::transform(src.begin(), src.end(), std::back_inserter(res), functor); return res; }... Also note that in your code you are imposing the extra requirement that the type T1 is default-constructible, which is an unneeded restriction. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 13 '12 at 21:25
    
@Robᵩ: Yeah. Or maybe the nice impl{} so that I never make that think-o again. (The real impl has a non-default ctor, and I didn't notice when I dumbed it down.) –  Andrew Lazarus Dec 13 '12 at 22:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is still two lines, but less typing (in both senses):

std::vector<T1> retval(impl.size());
for (const auto& p : impl) retval.push_back(p.first); 

Actually, now that I look at it, I'd prefer three lines:

std::vector<T1> retval;
retval.reserve(impl.size());
for (const auto& p : impl) retval.push_back(p.first); 

(Edited to remove move because there's no evidence that it's appropriate)

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Definite +1 for using reserve instead of forcing default construction in retval. (I wasn't thinking about that, as I should have been, because my T1 is scalar.) –  Andrew Lazarus Dec 13 '12 at 23:00

I do not know of a way to do this in one line using only the standard STL from C++11, without writing at least a (templated) helper function first.

You may be looking for a concept where the 2 iterators become one object and C++ starts to support behaviour similar to the LINQ extension methods in .NET: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_52_0/libs/range/doc/html/index.html

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You can get at least half of what you're looking for by using an insert iterator.

Allocate the vector without specifying a size,

std::vector<T1> retval;

...and then populate it by using back_inserter (from #include <iterator>):

std::transform(impl.cbegin(), impl.cend(), back_inserter(retval),[](const impl_node& in) { return *in.first; });
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1  
I like this better with the third line doing a reserve. –  Andrew Lazarus Dec 13 '12 at 23:03

Well, we could start with this:

template<typename Output, typename Input, typename Transformation>
auto transform( Input const& input, Transformation t )->Output {
  Output retval;
  retval.reserve(input.size());
  using std::cbegin; using std::cend;
  std::transform(cbegin(input), cend(input), std::back_inserter(retval));
  return retval;
}

Then work up to something like this:

namespace aux{
  using std::cbegin;
  template<typename T>
  auto adl_cbegin( T&& t )->decltype(cbegin(std::forward(t)));
}
template<typename Input, typename Transformation>
auto transform_vec( Input const& input, Transformation t )->
    std::vector<typename std::remove_ref<decltype(t(*adl_cbegin(input)))>::type>
{
  typedef std::vector<typename std::remove_ref<decltype(t(*adl_cbegin(input)))>::type> Output;
  Output retval;
//      retval.reserve(input.size()); -- need a way to do this if Input has an easy way to get size.  Too lazy to bother right now.
  using std::cbegin; using std::cend;
  std::transform(cbegin(input), cend(input), std::back_inserter(retval));
  return retval;
}

Notes: this takes anything iterable (vectors, arrays, pairs of iterators) and produces a and, from there, upgrade to producing a std::pair of boost::transform_iterator on the input range, so we can then insert the resulting transformation into an arbitrary container, and we only do the transformation work if we actually dereference the iterators.

Or, you know, just use the std::back_inserter(input) directly. :) The downside to that approach is that it doesn't do the reserve, so there are performance hits.

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