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I am just starting to learn triggers so please bear with me. If the row being inserted has a gift that is the same as any gift already in the table, print a message saying that the gift was already given to receiver from donor.

create or replace TRIGGER Same_Gift_Given
  BEFORE INSERT ON GIVING
  FOR EACH ROW
DECLARE
  giftgiven varchar(255);
BEGIN
  SELECT giftname INTO giftgiven from GIVING;
  IF :new.giftname = giftgiven then
    dbms_output.put_line(giftgiven || ' has already been gifted to ' || giving.receiver || ' by ' || giving.donor);
  end if;
END;
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Is this a homework assignment? In reality, it makes no sense to use a trigger to enforce this sort of requirement-- you would use a unique constraint. –  Justin Cave Dec 13 '12 at 21:26
    
Yes unfortunately this is hw. –  user1657563 Dec 13 '12 at 21:27
    
OK, and you are certain that the professor requires you to use a trigger? I'm guessing that the professor hasn't talked about mutating trigger exceptions. Is it safe to assume that you only need to support statements of the form INSERT INTO giving VALUES( ... and that your trigger is allowed to throw errors when people use the more general INSERT INTO giving SELECT syntax? Is it safe to assume that the trigger only needs to work for single-user systems and is allowed to fail for multi-user systems? –  Justin Cave Dec 13 '12 at 21:33
    
Yes these are all safe assumptions. As I already said, I'm just learning and this is my first introduction to triggers. –  user1657563 Dec 13 '12 at 21:41

2 Answers 2

This is a really awful homework problem. You would never, ever, ever us a trigger to do anything like this in a real system. It will break most INSERT operations and it will fail if there are ever multiple users. In reality, you would use a constraint. In reality, if for some reason you were forced at gunpoint to use a trigger, you would need a series of three triggers, a package, and a collection to do it properly.

What the professor is probably looking for

Just to emphasize, though, you would never, ever consider doing this in a real system

create or replace trigger same_gift_given
  before insert on giving
  for each row
declare
  l_existing_row giving%rowtype;
begin
  select *
    into l_existing_row
    from giving
   where giftname = :new.giftname
     and rownum = 1;

  dbms_output.put_line( :new.giftname || 
                           ' has already been gifted to ' ||
                           l_existing_row.receiver ||
                           ' from ' ||
                           l_existing_row.donor );
exception
  when no_data_found
  then
    null;
end;

This does not prevent you from inserting duplicate rows. It will throw a mutating trigger error if you try to do anything other than an INSERT ... VALUES on the giving table. It is inefficient. It does not handle multiple sessions. In short, it is absolutely atrocious code that should never be used in any real system.

What you would do in reality

In reality, you would create a constraint

ALTER TABLE giving
  ADD CONSTRAINT unique_gift UNIQUE( giftname );

That will work in a multi-user environment. It will not throw a mutating trigger exception. It is much more efficient. It is much less code. It actually prevents duplicate rows from being inserted.

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Thank you. For my sake, could you clarify what is going on? What is giving%rowtype and why are you assigning rownum = 1? –  user1657563 Dec 13 '12 at 22:02
    
@user1657563 - giving%rowtype is a record that is based on a single row of the giving table. You could create two separate local variables, l_receiver and l_donor and select both the receiver and the donor in the SELECT statement as well. Since the trigger does not actually prevent you from inserting multiple rows with the same giftname, the rownum = 1 predicate arbitrarily picks one of the duplicate gifts in order to prevent the query from throwing a too_many_rows exception when there are multiple duplicate gifts. –  Justin Cave Dec 13 '12 at 22:06
    
Trigger is invalid and failed re-validation. Cause: A trigger was attempted to be retrieved for execution and was found to be invalid. This also means that compilation/authorization failed for the trigger. –  user1657563 Dec 13 '12 at 22:17
    
@user1657563 - When you create the trigger, assuming you are using SQL*Plus, type "show errors" to show the errors. I had a stray semicolon inadvertently, I've updated my answer. –  Justin Cave Dec 13 '12 at 22:19

Let's try something a bit different:

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER GIVING_COMPOUND_INSERT
  FOR INSERT ON GIVING
  COMPOUND TRIGGER

  TYPE STRING_COL IS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(255) INDEX BY VARCHAR2(255);

  colGiftnames   STRING_COL;
  aGiftname      VARCHAR2(255);
  nCount         NUMBER;

  -- Note that the way the associative array is used here is a bit of a cheat.
  -- In the BEFORE EACH ROW block I'm putting the string of interest into the
  -- collection as both the value *and* the index.  Then, when iterating the
  -- collection only the index is used - the value is never retrieved (but
  -- since it's the same as the index, who cares?).  I do this because I'd
  -- rather not write code to call a constructor and maintain the collections
  -- size - so I just use an associative array and let Oracle do the work for
  -- me.

  BEFORE EACH ROW IS
  BEGIN
    colGiftnames(:NEW.GIFTNAME) := :NEW.GIFTNAME;
  END BEFORE EACH ROW;

  AFTER STATEMENT IS
  BEGIN
    aGiftname := colGiftnames.FIRST;
    WHILE aGiftname IS NOT NULL LOOP
      SELECT COUNT(*)
        INTO nCount
        FROM GIVING
        WHERE GIFTNAME = aGiftname;

      IF nCount > 1 THEN
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Found ' || nCount || ' instances of gift ''' ||
                             aGiftname || '''');
        RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR(-20001, 'Found ' || nCount ||
                                        ' instances of gift ''' ||
                                        aGiftname || '''');
      END IF;

      aGiftname := colGiftnames.NEXT(aGiftname);
    END LOOP;
  END AFTER STATEMENT;
END GIVING_COMPOUND_INSERT;

Again, this is a LOUSY way to try to guarantee uniqueness. In practice the "right way" to do this is with a constraint (either UNIQUE or PRIMARY KEY). Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should.

Share and enjoy.

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