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I have a data base with Price_old like:

Date --- Hour --- Price
_____________________________
Jan 1 --- 1 --- $3.0    
Jan 1 --- 2 --- $3.1    
Jan 1 --- 3 --- $3.3    
Jan 1 --- 4 --- $3.15    
Jan 2 --- 1 --- $2.95    
Jan 2 --- 2 --- $3.2    
Jan 2 --- 3 --- $3.05

What I then have is a spreadsheet, with the same structure, that I will be reading into a datatable, I'll call the new datatable Price_New, note that price new may not have all the same date/hours as Price_Old

So, I end up with 2 datatables, Price_Old, and Price_New, and what I need to do is update Price_old with the new prices in Price_New, and then commit those new prices to the Database.

I am kinda new to LINQ (about 30 mins of experience) and would really appreciate if someone could give me a pointer or two on whether or not this is doing in LINQ and what the best method would be.

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1  
Please provide more information on how your data is organized, if you want a solution. As it is, it looks like a rather broad question. For example, which table schema do you have? You would probably need to parse data from your input file. Do you know how to do it? Then construct an UPDATE statement, or use a DataAdapter. Are you familiar with either technique? etc. –  Neolisk Dec 13 '12 at 22:50
    
In the time you composed this question you could have doubled your linq experience :). –  Gert Arnold Dec 14 '12 at 0:42

2 Answers 2

If you're using something like linq-to-sql, it's the DataContext object that actually does the updating, not Linq itself.

You have three options, so far as I can see:

1) Use the DataContext object to add modified Price_Old objects to the DataContext. However, as Terry Aney has noted, there are some serious performance overhead concerns with this approach.

2) If PRICE_NEW were another table, you could use an UpdateBatch method similar to the one Terry Aney introduced (see link above), but unfortunately, I haven't found a variant that allows you to specify a list of existing data with new values for each unique row. But if there were, the resultant SQL would look like this:

UPDATE
    PRICE_OLD
SET
    PRICE =
    (
        SELECT
            PRICE
        FROM
            PRICE_NEW
        WHERE
            PRICE_OLD.DATE=PRICE_NEW.DATE
            AND PRICE_OLD.HOUR = PRICE_NEW.HOUR
    )
WHERE
    EXISTS
    (
        SELECT
            PRICE
        FROM
            PRICE_NEW
        WHERE
            PRICE_OLD.DATE=PRICE_NEW.DATE
            AND PRICE_OLD.HOUR = PRICE_NEW.HOUR
    )

And when you start doing things like this, you can just as well wrap this SQL in a stored procedure that you can then add to your DataContext and call in code. Not that figuring out how to manipulate expression trees wouldn't be fun. Unfortunately, even this doesn't allow for what you'd like to do: manipulate the data in some sort of data table, then magically apply the updates to the database. Which brings me to

3) If you were to generate a single SQL string that respects the changes you made to your DataTable, be it via Linq or something else, your UPDATE statement would involve a massive CASE statement and look something like this:

UPDATE
    PRICE_OLD
SET
    PRICE = CASE WHEN ID =1 THEN 3 WHEN ID = 2 THEN 3.1...
WHERE
    ID IN
    (
        1, 2, ...
    )

Where you construct a string, dynamically passing in values read from your DataTable (all implemented with parameterization, of course). As you might see, this looks bad and probably has some negative associated performance overhead. To get around this, I implement a three-stage approach:

a. Create a temp table with the same schema as my DataTable.

b. Use SqlBulkCopy to copy the DataTable to that temp table.

c. Use the SQL string I'd mentioned in above #2, replacing PRICE_NEW with the name of your temp table. This correctly updates your table without the need for any parametrization.

This may involve some string manipulation, but the upside is a set based update.

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From its name, LINQ = Language-Integrated Query - it's meant to read data. You cannot directly perform a database update using a LINQ query. There is a DataContext class, which makes database updates possible - it runs on top of LINQ.

Check this out: Introduction to LINQ.

And also this one: Walkthrough: Simple Object Model and Query (C#)

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@user1902490: what's type of db? A data set? Anyway, you can select data using LINQ and then update using regular methods. In the example you referenced, it looks like entity framework is being used. Do you have those classes pre-built? You may want to post them here. –  Neolisk Dec 13 '12 at 22:55
    
I was reading this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/bb737928#updsimp and they had examples of updating a base table using LINQ, although I could be completely misreading the samples. –  user1902490 Dec 13 '12 at 23:00
    
think our DB is sqlserver08, not sure about the dataset, i think its just the built in system.data.dataset –  user1902490 Dec 13 '12 at 23:04
    
@user1902490: see my edit - some ideas to help you get started. There is a lot to learn before you go this direction (LINQ to SQL). Because you did not explain your exact needs, it's hard to say whether it makes sense for you to use LINQ for it. If it's just one table with 3 fields, you may instead use a DataTable, an SqlDataAdapter, and a Fill method. –  Neolisk Dec 13 '12 at 23:05

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